inversion temperature

inversion temperature

[in′vər·zhən ‚tem·prə·chər]
(engineering)
The temperature to which one junction of a thermocouple must be raised in order to make the thermoelectric electromotive force in the circuit equal to zero, when the other junction of the thermocouple is held at a constant low temperature.
(thermodynamics)
The temperature at which the Joule-Thomson effect of a gas changes sign.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Drying kinetics of a porous spherical particle and the inversion temperature. Dry.
Finding the inversion temperature for water evaporation into an air-steam mixture.
On the rate of evaporation of water into a stream of dry air, humidified air and superheated steam, and the inversion temperature. Heat Mass Transfer, 2003, 46(19), 3717-3726.
Among the low-energy emulsification methods is induced transitional phase inversion, also known as the phase inversion temperature (PIT) method, which uses a particular characteristic of emulsions stabilized by ethoxylated nonionic surfactants.
Determination of the Phase Inversion Temperature (PIT) of the Systems.
Mansur, "Determination of the phase inversion temperature of orange oil/water emulsions by rheology and microcalorimetry," Analytical Letters, vol.
This is known as phase inversion temperature (PIT), also called low-energy emulsification method.
Shinoda and Saito [87] introduced the phase inversion temperature (PIT) method which is widely used in the industry [87].
Typically, nanoemulsions are processed according to the phase inversion temperature (PIT) method which makes use of the temperature-dependent phase behavior of ethoxylated emulsifiers.
The visually determined phase inversion temperature was the temperature at which a viscoelastic fluid consistency was first observed.
Table 2 shows that for the PAR/(E-EA-GMA) system, the inversion temperature moves from 262 [degrees] C to 300 [degrees] C, and the maximum torque increases from 900 m [multiplied by] [g.sub.f] to 3550 m [multiplied by] [g.sub.f] as the amount of interfacial reaction is increased.
The inversion temperature of two premier cryogenic gases, hydrogen and helium, are quite low.