invert

(redirected from invertibility)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

invert

1. Psychiatry
a. a person who adopts the role of the opposite sex
b. another word for homosexual
2. Architect
a. the lower inner surface of a drain, sewer, etc.
b. an arch that is concave upwards, esp one used in foundations
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

invert

[′in‚vərt]
(civil engineering)
The floor or bottom of a conduit.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

invert

invert
In plumbing, the lowest point or the lowest inside surface of a channel, conduit, drain, pipe, or sewer pipe.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
An improved method in which both overlapping by invertibility and multiple UIO sequences are considered is proposed to achieve test sequence reduction for wireless protocol conformance testing of IoT.
By [6, Theorem 5.21] and the invertibility of I-[mu](A-B[N.sub.[dagger]]K)(t) on [[a, [rho](b)].sub.T], the matrix [PHI](t) exists and is invertible on [[a, b].sub.T].
a) Let us first show the invertibility of A + G(r) for any r [greater than or equal to] 0.
The derivative of [x.sub.2] allows the estimation of the unknown input u only if 1-[x.sup.2.sub.2] [not equal to] 0 In conclusion, the set of singularity manifolds for the left invertibility problem is given by:
Remark 3.4 The order in which the levels are traversed is a key ingredient to invertibility. For example, in the case of a = b = 2 and r =1, s = -1, if we scan levels in the order k = ..., 2, 1, 0, -1, -2, ..., both of the paths NENE and NEEN map to NNEE.
Among his topics are useful theorems, the fundamental solution, properties of layer potentials, the invertibility of layer potentials and other properties, and the uniqueness of solutions.
Brannas, "Invertibility of non-linear time series models", Communications in Statistics--Theory and Methods, vol.
This captures an idea that Callander (2008) refers to as proportional invertibility. To see the intuition behind it, consider a simple example: An expert reveals how a change of the minimum wage to $7.25 translates onto the national unemployment rate.
The invertibility of this process requires that the endogenous variables in the VAR should not be integrated.
Also, in firm level data a significant portion of sample may report zero new investment and dropping out such firms from the analysis to satisfy the 'invertibility condition' may introduce truncation bias.