involuntary

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involuntary

Physiol (esp of a movement or muscle) performed or acting without conscious control
References in periodicals archive ?
The residency-plus model fails to address the inherent initial involuntariness of residency, the familial, social, and cultural costs of exit, and the risk to property within the state even after the owner departs.
278) Elevating moral involuntariness to the level of a principle of fundamental justice has very serious ramifications which might not yet be fully appreciated.
42) Moral involuntariness, on the other hand, has yet to replace mens rea, especially since the Supreme Court of Canada insisted on keeping the former separate from the notion of moral innocence.
The same results follow from an examination of the involuntariness theory of duress.
The consideration of alternate harms connotes a choice between interests or values that cohabits uneasily with the requirement of normative involuntariness.
However, the unfortunate result of Ruzic is that it has "allowed moral involuntariness to require an acquittal even when the accused's behaviour is morally blameworthy.
Haley presented the type of brutal scenario typical of the early involuntariness cases.
64) Additionally, the Court subjected Edwards to the seemingly omnipresent balancing test applied the previous Term in a Sixth Amendment confession case, (65) warning of the costs occasioned by Edwards in terms of "voluntary confessions it excludes from trial" and cautioning that "[t]he Edwards presumption of involuntariness is justified only in circumstances where .
The results of their study show that the first group is more responsive to positive and negative hallucination suggestions and during hypnosis they had a greater experience of involuntariness.
They were experiencing a shift in health status (even if they may have thought it was temporary), and were learning, for the first time, of the irreversibility, involuntariness and undesirability of such a shift in status in relation to their health.
The most plausible argument to be made from involuntariness is this: the waiver term was unfavorable, but donating their embryos was so important, and the opportunity to do so without agreeing to a waiver so lacking, that donors' acceptance of the waiver was coerced.
indicia of involuntariness in many of these cases, courts ruled each of