involute

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involute

1. Botany (esp of petals, leaves, etc., in bud) having margins that are rolled inwards
2. (of certain shells) closely coiled so that the axis is obscured
3. Geometry the curve described by the free end of a thread as it is wound around another curve, the evolute, such that its normals are tangential to the evolute

involute

[¦in·və¦lüt]
(biology)
Being coiled, curled, or rolled in at the edge.
(mathematics)
A curve produced by any point of a perfectly flexible inextensible thread that is kept taut as it is wound upon or unwound from another curve.
A curve that lies on the tangent surface of a given space curve and is orthogonal to the tangents to the given curve.
A surface for which a given surface is one of the two surfaces of center.

involute

1. A curve traced by a point at the end of a string as the string is unwound from a stationary cylinder.
2. Curved spirally.
References in periodicals archive ?
Here, things are involuted, so the town, which features an abandoned park complete with benches and a barren tree, is inside the train.
A full description is attainable through the establishment of the geometrical shapes of involuted textual flows.
The rambling, involuted, self-conscious style of "In the Storehouse" is an ideal vehicle for chronicling the protagonist's love affairs with kimono and, almost as an aside, the object of his dalliances as he wore each.
Persistent Disturbances consists of seven brief stories, each a study in anomie: a recital of a couple's tense visit to their parents, a hair-raising encounter between a woman and a friend of her lover's at the London Zoo, an increasingly involuted account of a violin-and-piano recital, mostly written in the present tense.
The exhibition is an inventory of brooding melancholics from the history of Western representation, beginning with the antique: artists, saints, and ill-fated lovers as well as allegorical personifications of Melancholy itself, at the center of which sits Durer's great Melencolia I of 1514, forever fixed in place as the involuted grande dame of imagination in anguish.
The cryptophilosophical commentary scribbled into these pictures hints that Arce devised "Disolver/Coleccionar" as an involuted method for digesting all the art which would otherwise motivate him to quit painting.