iodophor

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Related to iodophors: hypochlorites

iodophor

[i′äd·ə‚fȯr]
(chemistry)
Any compound that is a carrier of iodine.
References in periodicals archive ?
The most common skin preparation agents used today include products containing iodophors. PVP-Iodine products have been widely used for pre-operative skin preparation and in various surgical procedures and shown to significantly lower subsequent infection rates.
The physical action of washing and rinsing hands water such circumstances is recommended because alcohols, chlorhexidine, iodophors, and other antiseptic agents have poor activity against spores.
Phenolic compounds, iodophors, nitrogen compounds, and organometallics will remain the largest product categories, accounting for three-quarters of the demand by 2009.
Remaining the largest product categories will be phenolic compounds, iodophors, nitrogen compounds, and organometallics, accounting for three-quarters of demand in 2009.
Phenolic compounds, iodophors, nitrogen compounds and organometallics will remain the largest product categories, accounting for three-quarters of demand in 2009.
Mycobacteria are also quite resistant to agents used for surface and instrument disinfection, including quaternary ammonium compounds, phenolics, iodophors, and glutaraldehyde (16,22,23,36) and can degrade the disinfectant morpholine (20).
iodophors) are widely used as antiseptic products during surgical interventions [5-7].
Bread was iodised as a precaution against goitre, but residual iodophors in milk from sanitisers used in the dairy industry caused trouble by increasing iodine intake, and alternatives were quickly introduced.
A complete 10-minute surgical scrub (abdomen, external genitalia, and perineum) with iodophors is undertaken immediately following the surgical shaving.
Classes of disinfectants and their common-use dilutions include alcohols (60 to 90% in water), quaternary ammonium compounds (0.4 to 1.6%), phenolics (0.5 to 5%), iodophors (75 ppm), glutaraldehydes (2%), household bleach (sodium hypochlorite, diluted 1: 10), and hydrogen peroxide (3 to 6%).
That coloring, which has been banned in the United States, turns the salmon flesh pink like that of wild salmon, rather than "hatchery grey." Then the farmers add chlorine, sodium hydroxide, iodophors (a solution of iodine), and calcium oxide to keep the fish and the cages clean.
Iodophors, hypochlorite, quaternary ammonium compounds are common sanitizers used for cleaning of many dairy utensils and equipment.