ion pair


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ion pair

[′ī‚än ‚per]
(nucleonics)
A positive ion and an equal-charge negative ion, usually an electron, that are produced by the action of radiation on a neutral atom or molecule.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
As the shape of the absorption maximum does not vary with pH, it is assumed that in this pH range only one type of ion pair is formed.
This observation may be explained by the fact that there are more ionic species in solution than those considered for the regression analysis, for example ion pairs or soluble organic matter.
The detector was the same as ours, but heptafluorobutyric acid was used as ion pair reagent in the mobile phase and sample reconstitution [9].
These include (i) precipitation of cadmium as [Cd.sub.3][([PO.sub.4]).sub.2]; (ii) co-sorption of phosphate and cadmium as an ion pair; (iii) surface complex formation of cadmium onto the sorbed phosphate; and (iv) phosphate-induced cadmium sorption.
* The stearate ion formed a strong, stable and tight ion pair with bulky triethyl benzyl ammonium cation of TEBA.
Whereas, a plot of 1/kobs versus 1/[BrO -] is linear with a positive and non-zero intercept (Fig 3) which is indicative of ion pair formation between charged species.
Consequently, in 1P system [Cl.sup.-] and [Na.sup.+] form ion pair which interacts with membrane mainly by Na+ rather than [Cl.sub.-] (Fig.
We carried out ion pair separation by use of the Phenomenex ODS-3 reversed-phase column with a mobile phase containing 5 mmol/L tetrabutylammonium, 5% methanol, and 3 mmol/L malonic acid (pH 5.6), with a flow rate of 1.2 mL/min.
HPLC methods have been reported, but these generally require ion pair chromatography (4,5) or sample derivatization (6) to improve the chromatography.
Every metabolite was analyzed with its own specific ion pair, only adenosine, uridine, and thymidine also showed the same ion pairs as adenine, uracil, and thymine because of spontaneous fragmentation in the ion source.