ionic charge


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ionic charge

[ī′än·ik ′chärj]
(physics)
The total charge of an ion.
The charge of an electron; the charge of any ion is equal to this electron charge in magnitude, or is an integral multiple of it.
References in periodicals archive ?
The beauty of the ionic dryers, according to the players, is while most consumers think of hair dryers as being damaging to their hair, the ionic charges actually work to condition the hair, making the hair shaft more full and smooth and providing a frizz-free finish.
They also decrease surface tension, increase spreading of the herbicide on the leaf surface, neutralize ionic charges, and increase herbicide penetration into the leaf.
Its mode of action defers as it dries with contact with humidity in the air and not just dry air once dried it forms strong bonds with the fabric using opposite ionic charges on these substrates.
Called Capmix, this method uses capacitive electrodes made of activated carbon that can absorb ionic charges in the concentrated stream--the sea--and release these charges in the dilute stream--the river.
Pointing to the advantages of nano-membranes, he said, "Ability of ion separation from solutions at fairly low pressures is one of the unique features of nano-membranes, which is a result of having ionic charges on their surface.
As the batteries sit in a package, they lose their charge because the electrodes and electrolytes that make up the active part of the battery are co-mingled and exchange ionic charges. This condition is exacerbated by heat and the types of chemistry used to manufacture the battery.
This novel and patent-pending technology relies on the ability to produce stable dispersion and solutions containing polymer molecules with different ionic charges.
The growth of soy-based texturized vegetable proteins is a prime example, for in this area Sethness has developed Caramel Color with ionic charges specifically designed to make the color adhere effectively to the soy while standing up to the heat and pressure of extrusion.
Ozonation is a process of chemical disequilibrium and reacts in less than 10 min, destroying the cellular membranes and altering the ionic charges of the microbes.
That final jumble of bends is mediated by a variety of short- and long-range interactions, including positive and negative ionic charges, van der Waals forces, and hydrogen and disulfide bonds--all acting within a matrix of water-soluble and water-repelling molecular subunits.