ipecac


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ipecac

(ĭp`ĭkăk), drug obtained from the dried roots of a creeping shrub, Cephaelis (or Psychotria) ipecacuanha, native to Brazil but cultivated in other tropical climates. There are three varieties of the root, brown, red, and gray, varying according to the age of the plant, its place of growth, or the method of drying. Emetine, the active principle of ipecac, is obtained from the bark of the root. It is a powerful poison that produces vomiting and is sometimes prescribed to relieve the stomach of some other poison. Ipecac is used as an expectorant in the treatment of bronchitis or croup, stimulating bronchial secretions to make coughing easier. Brazilian Native Americans used ipecac for centuries to treat amebic infections. Its use became more widespread in the 17th cent., and the pure substance emetine is still used in the treatment of amebic dysentery and amebic hepatitis, as well as some parasitic infestations. Ipecac must be used with great caution and only under medical supervision.
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ipecac

[′ip·ə‚kak]
(botany)
Any of several low, perennial, tropical South American shrubs or half shrubs in the genus Cephaelis of the family Rubiaceae; the dried rhizome and root, containing emetine, cephaeline, and other alkaloids, is used as an emetic and expectorant.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ipecacuanha

, ipecac
1. a low-growing South American rubiaceous shrub, Cephaelis ipecacuanha
2. a drug prepared from the dried roots of this plant, used as a purgative and emetic
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The equipment and indication for gastric lavage were inappropriate in 34 out of 37 cases and, although no longer recommended, syrup of ipecac was administered to induce emesis in 3 cases.
Some drugs are given to deliberately cause vomiting: hypertonic salt solutions or ipecac syrup used to be recommended for inducing vomiting in cases of accidental ingestion of poisons.
Ipecac Severe and constant nausea that is unrelieved by vomiting.
With the exception of witnessed ingestions of highly toxic plants, there are few indications for the induction of vomiting using syrup of ipecac. Ipecac administration is absolutely contraindicated in obtunded or seizing patients who have lost upper airway protective reflexes and are at risk of pulmonary aspiration.
Compounds that block NK-1 receptors, including vofopitant, CP-122,721, CJ-11,794, fosaprepitant (L758,298), aprepitant (MK-869), and casopitant, reduce emesis following cisplatin, ipecac, apomorphine, and radiation therapy (8), (11).
If your child does eat a plant, even if you know it is toxic, then giving her ipecac or anything else to make her vomit is no longer recommended.
"So, for example, our data will show that we do not sell a lot of smelling salts or ipecac syrup," Trappani says.
Popular plant-based drugs include Ipecac, which contains the roots and rhizome of the Brazilian plant ipecacuanha, ExLax, containing senna imported primarily from India, Sudan and Egypt, and Metamucil, which contains psyllium, generally from India.
So I tore through the medicine cabinet, swallowed ipecac syrup and started throwing up.
* Pack first-aid supplies such as sunscreen, hand sanitizer, paper towels, adhesive bandages, antiseptic cream, bottled water, baby wipes, syrup of ipecac, plastic bags, extra ponchos or rain jackets, a cell phone with extra batteries.
It is not uncommon to find persons with eating disorders misusing or abusing diuretics, laxatives, ipecac, or diet pills to manipulate their weight.