iridium


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iridium

(ĭrĭd`ēəm), metallic chemical element; symbol Ir; at. no. 77; at. wt. 192.217; m.p. about 2,410°C;; b.p. about 4,130°C;; sp. gr. 22.55 at 20°C;; valence +3 or +4. Iridium is a very hard, usually brittle, extremely corrosion-resistant silver-white metal with a face-centered cubic crystalline structure. It falls between platinum and osmium in Group 9 of the periodic tableperiodic table,
chart of the elements arranged according to the periodic law discovered by Dmitri I. Mendeleev and revised by Henry G. J. Moseley. In the periodic table the elements are arranged in columns and rows according to increasing atomic number (see the table entitled
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. It is not certain whether osmium or iridium is the most dense element. Iridium is found uncombined in nature as the metal and in combination with osmium and platinum. It is obtained commercially from osmiridium, a byproduct of platinum production. The metal is used in pivot bearings and in scientific and other special equipment, such as surgical tools. It is also used in making chemical crucibles. Iridium is used principally in alloys. An alloy with osmium is used to make fountain-pen nibs. Alloys with platinum are used in heavy-duty electrical contacts. An alloy of 10 parts iridium with 90 parts platinum is used in the international kilogram standard in Paris. Formerly the international meter standard was the distance between two marks on a bar made of that same alloy; it is now based on the wavelength of a line in the spectrum of an isotope of krypton. Iridium is chemically very unreactive. Pure iridium metal is not attacked by acids or acid mixtures, not even by aqua regia, which dissolves gold. Fluorine and chlorine attack it only at a red heat. It is oxidized slowly at high temperatures. It resists attack by fused bases and by most molten metals. Iridium was discovered in 1804 by Smithson Tennant; it is so named because of its various highly colored salts.

Iridium

 

Ir, a chemical element of group VIII of Mendeleev’s periodic system. Atomic number, 77; atomic weight, 192.22.

Iridium belongs to the platinum group of metals. In nature it is represented by two stable isotopes,191Ir (38.5 percent) and193Ir (61.5 percent). The element was discovered in 1804 by the British chemist S. Tennant (1761–1815) and named iridium (from the Greek iris, rainbow) because of the varied colors of its salts. Iridium is rare in the earth’s crust (1 X 10−7 percent by weight), occurring mainly together with platinum. A silver-white metal, it is very hard and extremely refractory and has high chemical stability. It is included with the other metals of the platinum group, as well as with gold and silver, among the noble metals because of the above properties.

iridium

[i′rid·ē·əm]
(chemistry)
A metallic element, symbol Ir, atomic number 77, atomic weight 192.2, in the platinum group; insoluble in acids, melting at 2454°C.
(metallurgy)
A silver-white, brittle, hard metal used in jewelry, electric contacts, electrodes, resistance wires, and pen tips.

iridium

a very hard inert yellowish-white transition element that is the most corrosion-resistant metal known. It occurs in platinum ores and is used as an alloy with platinum. Symbol: Ir; atomic no.: 77; atomic wt.: 192.22; valency: 3 or 4; relative density: 22.42; melting pt.: 2447?C; boiling pt.: 4428?C

Iridium

(Iridium Satellite LLC, Bethesda, MD, www.iridium.com) A phone and pager service that provides global coverage using handheld phones and low-earth orbit (LEO) satellites. Data access is available at 2.4 Kbps and Internet access at 10 Kbps. Announced in 1990 and completed in 1998 at a cost of USD $6 billion, Iridium was the first global satellite phone service. It originally used cellular partners to provide standard cellphone service when satellites were not required. Iridium LLC went into Chapter 11 in August 1999, and in late 2000, Iridium Satellite LLC was formed to resurrect the system. See LEO and Globalstar.
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