iron count

iron count

[′ī·ərn ‚kau̇nt]
(chemical engineering)
An analytic determination of the iron compounds in a product stream; reflects the occurrence and the extent of corrosion.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rusty cylinder walls might spike the iron count, but visible evidence of iron and steel is another matter and needs to be looked at immediately.
The total wall loss, based upon the increased iron count, was 0.4 mils (0.01 mm) over the exposure period (90 days), or an annualized corrosion loss of 1.6 mpy (0.041 mm/yr).
1 Increase your iron: 'As we age, ferritin - the protein that stores iron in the body - levels can drop, and a low iron count can cause thinning.'
* High iron count (unacceptable range levels vary by product and are typically between 15-20 parts per million)
In addition, he gets daily doses of medicine to reduce the high iron count resulting from such frequent transfusions.
"It could be anything from piles or irritable bowel syndrome, to Crohn's disease, colitis or even bowel cancer - but it's better to be safe than sorry." Amy was diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease while a human geography student at The University of Sheffield - "I was sat in the Union beer garden one Friday afternoon when my GP called and told me to go to hospital immediately because my blood and iron count was so low that I might need a blood transfusion" - and was soon regularly taking more than 10 tablets a day.
But the results of a routine blood test showed Geoffrey had a low iron count which can be related to internal bleeding so he was booked in for further tests at the James Cook Hospital within a matter of days in September 2011.
Cow and Gate's Big Iron Count Report assessed the dietary intake of 220 toddlers aged between 12 and 24 months.
But despite efforts to improve her iron count, Lauren remained unwell until her own doctor took a blood test - and discovered she had coeliac disease.
QMY iron count is low and I get very tired at times but I haven't been prescribed any medication.