iron lung

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iron lung,

device used to maintain artificial respirationartificial respiration,
any measure that causes air to flow in and out of a person's lungs when natural breathing is inadequate or ceases, as in respiratory paralysis, drowning, electric shock, choking, gas or smoke inhalation, or poisoning.
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 over an extended period of time. Before the successful vaccination program against poliomyelitis, it was used mostly in treatment of that disease. Currently, its main usage is in cases where the respiration control center of the brain has been damaged (e.g. skull fractures, brain tumors and stroke) or where the diaphragm is paralyzed by spinal cord disease or injury. Invented (1928) by Philip Drinker, the iron lung is composed of a cylindrical steel drum, which encloses the entire body with only the head exposed. A rubber diaphragm makes the cylinder airtight without putting undue pressure on the neck. Pumps raise and lower the pressure within the chamber. A number of problems exist with the iron lung machine; food or vomit may be aspirated into the lungs, and serious skin ulcers may develop in a patient who is immobilized for long periods of time.

iron lung

an airtight metal cylinder enclosing the entire body up to the neck and providing artificial respiration when the respiratory muscles are paralysed, as by poliomyelitis
References in periodicals archive ?
Nurses clearly rose to the occasion, even in very trying circumstances; however, their technological expertise in caring for all polio patients, and particularly those in iron lungs, flew in the face of the discourse concerning nurses as feminine voluntary caregivers.
"I'm a physician." He'd expected the young man to ask him about his illness, or possibly the iron lungs. A moment later, he realized that the young man was asking about the iron lungs.
(12) The highly demanding and specialized nursing care required for hospitalized patients in iron lungs was believed to be the precursor for the development of intensive care units.
SURVIVOR: Betty Patten was luckier than some children who ended up in iron lungs but she, like thousands of others, is now suffering again as a result of polio
You could be paralyzed; you could be stuck inside a huge machine called an iron lung; you could die.
Poliomyelitis (infantile paralysis) was a particularly frightening disease, because when it did not kill, it often paralyzed permanently, leaving people in wheelchairs or even iron lungs. What's more, it often hit young people.
People with the most severe disabilities (such as polio patients in "iron lungs" decades ago and kidney dialysis patients in more recent years) have received home treatment for years.
@Adameffo got to be Guzan for me, came in and cemented the number one position & looked solid @tomfahy1 Brett the hitman Holman and his iron lungs, I haven't seen a player give this much energy to the cause in years @cmeehan1984 Matthew lowton-took to the premiership like a duck to water ,sound defensively and wants to get surge forward!
During the polio epidemic of the 1950s, many people survived in hospital only with the assistance of "iron lungs".
If it was up to these governmental death-watch doctors, my generation would all be in iron lungs now.
In fact, too bad Jonas Salk invented the polio vaccine; Iron lungs were good enough for children in the past; we have at least a 200-year supply of Iron Lungs.
In 1955, artificial respirators - or "iron lungs" - were developedto enable paralysed polio sufferers to breathe.