iron metabolism


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iron metabolism

[′ī·ərn mə′tab·ə‚liz·əm]
(biochemistry)
The chemical and physiological processes involved in absorption of iron from the intestine and in its role in erythrocytes.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, further studies are required to address the safety of this combination treatment and interspecies differences in iron metabolism between rats and human in addition to have better understanding of the role of the hepcidin.
Study Selection: Articles related to iron metabolism, iron overload in patients with CHC, or the effects of iron on HCV life cycle were selected for the review.
Measurement of sTfR is considered better for reflecting iron metabolism as its levels focus on both body iron stores and total erythropoiesis.
Hepcidin, ferroportin-1 and transferrin are associated with iron metabolism and their expression can be affected under different physiological or pathological conditions.
The researchers also showed pathways caused by high doses of vitamin C by which altered iron metabolism in cancer cells lead to increased to sensitivity to cancer cell killing.
In recent years, after the discovery of hepcidin, a negative regulator of iron metabolism, studies on thalassemia patients have suggested that the cause of increase in intestinal iron absorption may be the decrease in synthesis of hepcidin.
The broad, yet vague, diagnostic term "anemia of chronic disease" best categorizes the complexity of events that lead to paradoxical disorders related to iron metabolism.
The effects of E2 on intracellular iron metabolism in SKOV-3 were most evident at 5 nM/24 h dose.
Anaemia due to hypothyroidism is characterized by a small decrease of the half-life of red cells, caused either by a disturbance of the iron metabolism or by resistance to erythropoietin action.
It is unclear whether the hyperferritinemia is secondary to an acute-phase response or whether abnormal iron metabolism or a variant ferritin is involved in the pathogenesis of AOSD.
Cellular iron metabolism and its epigenetic regulation are well-balanced and tightly controlled in normal cells [5].