irrational

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irrational

1. Maths
a. not rational
b. (as noun)
2. Prosody in Greek or Latin verse
a. of or relating to a metrical irregularity, usually the occurrence of a long syllable instead of a short one
b. denoting a metrical foot where such an irregularity occurs

Irrational

 

in the most general meaning, that which is beyond the bounds of reason; alogical or nonintellectual; incommensurable with rational thinking or even contradicting it. The irrational is generally contrasted with the rational. The irrational as something inaccessible to rational cognition and inexpressible in logical concepts is one of the basic reference points for a number of idealistic currents, jointly referred to as philosophical irrationalism (for example, intuitionism and voluntarism). In the religious world view the rational is viewed as prerational (spontaneous-chaotic, not shaped by the Logos), as distinguished from both the rational and suprarational (the mystical, given in revelation).

In the theory of knowledge of dialectical materialism the irrational is understood to be something not yet known but knowable in principle.

References in periodicals archive ?
We should also not be misunderstood to accuse any individuals of inconsistency or irrationality. We are concerned with a form of collective irrationality that can arise in a group decision-making context even if each individual member of the group reasons perfectly rationally.
Carrie thus concluded that this proof for the irrationality of [square root of 2] could indeed be generalised to show the irrationality of [square root of n] for all n with some odd powered prime p in the prime decomposition for n, which she then rigorously demonstrated was all non-perfect squares.
Since then, irrationality has become a growth industry, both for scholars such as Duke psychologist Dan Ariely and popular science writers including Jonah Lehrer, but few authors have thought as long or as deeply about the subject as Kahneman.
Numerous studies report relations between irrationality and personality factors (e.g., Culhane & Watson, 2003; Day & Maltby, 2003; Hart & Hope, 2004; Hutchinson, Patock Peckham, Cheong, & Nagoshi, 1998; Kordacova, 1989; Korlinski, 1982; Wicker, Richardson, & Lambert, 1985; Zurawski & Smith, 1987).
Those are among the nuggets in The Upside of Irrationality: The Unexpected Benefits of Defying Logic at Work and at Home, a scholarly, yet breezily written analysis of the research on the rationality of a wide range of behavior.
Listening to the points that arose during Q&A and in the conversations that came up between presentations and during the lunches, there was a strong recurring theme that resonates with my background in communication and psychology: perhaps the greatest obstacle facing radon testing, radon mitigation, and radon-resistant new construction is human irrationality.
First, it denounces what another country does, then it copies that practice without any realization of the irrationality. For example, when the United States allowed American "victims of terrorism" to sue Iran in American courts, Iran said that was illegal under international law.
"Caveman Logic: The Persistence of Primitive Thinking in a Modern World" is a discussion of this irrationality that seems to affect all of mankind.
"Free Market Madness: Why Human Nature Is At Odds With Economics--And Why It Matters" is a look into a problem with the Free Market, namely, the irrationality of mankind.
Nuts: A Collection of the Cult-Hit Columns" is a collection of writings from Joe Dungan who seeks to prove the insanity of Los Angelans and encourage people to stay far, far away from the incessant madness and be glad they don't live in a town where irrationality is law.
Sheer luck was part of the US's ultimate victory over the USSR but alongside luck lies irrationality: Khrushchev was ultimately a rational man.
Ariely shows that in terms of the standard economic analysis irrationality is commonplace--and, he maintains, predictable.