irreducible

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irreducible

Maths
a. (of a polynomial) unable to be factorized into polynomials of lower degree, as (x2 + 1) FORMULA
b. (of a radical) incapable of being reduced to a rational expression, as &#221A(x + 1)
References in periodicals archive ?
The problem, again, is that since the time of Descartes, science has for methodological purposes essentially defined matter in such a way that meanings, purposes, and irreducibly qualitative features are excluded from it.
Lash explores the classically modern notion of experience in Kantian critique and argues that it is irreducibly dependent upon Kant's posited self-identical subject.
A play is an irreducibly unique stratagem that people and organizations employ to advance their point of view, from the preferred win-win to the zero-sum game.
A defender of Streumer's particular way of understanding the error theory could argue that moral reasons are irreducibly normative but epistemic reasons are not irreducibly normative.
Human beings, all of them, are irreducibly precious" (361).
Our aim was to convey that the basic appeal of justice is a fundamentally, irreducibly human appeal.
But this aspect is, for the most part, what eventually made the production so provocative: the underlying sense of our own (metatheatrical) awareness of the particular culture in which the play is now being produced, and that the atmosphere this awareness eventually creates and thrives in is also irreducibly anachronistic.
However, while the book is irreducibly eclectic, some themes can perhaps be teased out.
This is a point of convergence with Rainey, who writes of modernism as' at once stubbornly international and irreducibly local' (p.
We now know there are creatures such as the bacterial flagellum which are irreducibly complex: If you remove even one part of its 30-part organic rotary motor, it will not operate.
It is a truism, an unquestioned cultural assumption, that there's something inherently "feminine" about dance, just as--for all the efforts by feminists to change this bias--we still see sports as irreducibly "masculine" at root.
First, he argues that an examination of pre- and post-war poems do not demonstrate successive stages of apocalyptic, then anti-apocalyptic discourse (as other critics have argued), but rather a consistently articulated tension between the two: Woodland then wonders whether or not there is "something irreducibly ambivalent, double, or undecidable" in Stevens's poetry and prose (xiii).