Pulpitis

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Pulpitis

 

an inflammation of the dental pulp caused by an infection usually resulting from advanced dental caries. Pulpitis may also be caused by a trauma (for example, fracture of a tooth crown near the pulp) or chemical irritation (acids, formaldehyde). Pulpitis generally develops as an acute process. The principal symptom is sharp intermittent pain that frequently irradiates along the branches of the trigeminal nerve; the pain may simulate disease of the adjacent teeth. When left untreated, pulpitis results in periodontitis.

Treatment involves the complete or partial removal of the pulp after it is devitalized or anesthetized. Pulpitis can sometimes be cured and the pulp preserved if the patient visits a dentist promptly. The final stage of treatment is filling the tooth.

References in periodicals archive ?
In terms of diagnosis, the most challenging condition is irreversible pulpitis.
Anesthetic efficacy of supplemental buccal and lingual infiltrations of articaine and lidocaine after an inferior alveolar nerve block in patients with irreversible pulpitis.
Irreversible pulpitis is considered more likely to experience local anaesthesia failure as compared to non-inflamed control teeth4.
Efficacy of combining a buccal infiltration with an inferior alveolar nerve block for mandibular molars with irreversible pulpitis.
Buccal infiltration with 4% articaine is equally effective as articaine IANB in anaesthetising mandibular molars with irreversible pulpitis [Poorni et al.
Patients and Methods: Three hundred and sixty patients with irreversible pulpitis were divided into two groups.
38) In a study of patients with irreversible pulpitis, there was no significant difference between 3.
Anesthetic Effectiveness of the supplemental intraligamentary injection, administered with a computer controlled local anesthetic delivery system in patients with irreversible pulpitis.
5,6,7] Females outnumbered Male patients in our study which is consistent with some studies [6,7,8] and was different from finding of some other studies [2,5,8,9] Dental caries leading to reversible and irreversible pulpitis and subsequently manifesting as acute conditions like dentoalveolar abscess and chronic suppurative osteomyelitis was the commonest oral disease in the present study.
Comparison of anesthetic efficacy of 4% articaine and 2% lidocaine for maxillary buccal infiltration in patients with irreversible pulpitis.
Conclusion: Necrotic pulp was the most common indication of initial RCT followed by irreversible pulpitis.