sangoma

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sangoma

South African a witch doctor, healer, or herbalist
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
UBUNTU, SEXUAL AUTONOMY, AND ISANGOMA AS FLEXIBLE AFRICAN TRADITIONS
The social and religious function of the prophets in Christianity and isangoma (seer) in Ndebele religion are the same.
The python then speaks to the assembled shade-snakes and inquires of them if the dreamer is the one who has been called to become an isangoma. The shade-snakes must concur before the python permits the dreamer to symbolically take from the pile of medicines that it guards (Berglund 1976:141), in essence gaining access to the python's supernatural wisdom.
Regarding more contemporary issues, Michael Lambert provides a fascinating discussion of the collaboration between isangoma Nomagugu Ngobese and feminist academic Kathyrn Kendall in the creation of a contemporary 'revived' festival for the Zulu goddess Nomkhubilwane; Liz and Imogen Gunner collaborate to explore social performance and the practice of 'self-writing' by isicathamiya musicians in the 'age of 9/11'; and Nsizwa Dlamini discusses conflicts over the representations of Zulu identity in Natal's museums.
* Ancestrally-designated diviner or mediator (isangoma in Zulu; igqira in Xhosa) provides a diagnosis usually through spiritual means.
Die sendingstasie en hospitaaltjie in "Tweede kind" word vanuit 'n Europese verwysingsraamwerk gekleur as baken van oorwinning in die geestelike stryd teen "donker Afrika, blyplek van Umngoma en Isangoma" (p.
There are estimated to be over 250,000 traditional healers in South Africa (Edwards, 1999), of which two distinct types can be differentiated: the inyanga (italics refer to the Zulu term), who specialises in herbal medicines and potions; and the isangoma, who uses divination, mediumship, and what might be termed "psychic healing" to assist their clients.
In "Tweede kind" (Second Child) the wife of a white missionary and a thirteen-year-old black girl abandoned by her people on instruction of the Isangoma (witch doctor) give birth at the same time in a remote missionary hospital.
For a contrary view see Sigqibo Dwane, "Christ's Own Isangoma: A Sermon for a Bishop," GrapeVine 39, December 1993.