ischemic necrosis

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ischemic necrosis

[i′skē·mik ne′krō·səs]
(medicine)
Local tissue death due to impaired blood supply.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Coroner Joe McCrisken found the cause of death had been hypoxic ischaemic necrosis due to cardio-respiratory arrest, cerebral oedema and spinal haemorrhage due to violent shaking.
An area of ischaemic necrosis develops near the point of contact between sutures and tissues.
Magos, "Successful myomectomy following infected ischaemic necrosis of uterine fibroids after uterine artery embolisation," BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, vol.
Intraretinal haemorrhages occur when aggregated sickled red blood cells abruptly occlude an arteriole, resulting in ischaemic necrosis and 'blowout' of the vessel wall.
RCN is characterised histologically by ischaemic necrosis of large portions of the renal cortices which is irreversible [9, 10].
Calciphylaxis as a rare pathological and clinical entity generally develops in patients with renal failure, chronic dialysis and multiple factors aggravating arterial calcification and progressive peripheral ischaemic necrosis.4 Skin lesions can appear as enduring nodular painful plaques, purple in colour, necrotic scars, ulcerations or dry gangrene.3 Intestinal, splenic, myocardial and cerebral infarcts can develop with visceral arterial calcifications.
The high pressure in the cuff compresses the mucosa against the rigid tracheal cartilage rings, resulting in mucosal damage and ischaemic necrosis. [1] Fibrotic healing of this lesion leads to the gradual stenosis of a section of the trachea.
ISCHAEMIC NECROSIS DUE TO NON-INFLAMMATORY VASCULAR OCCLUSION
We particularly noted lesions in the central system of moose that were characterized by nonpurulent meningo-encephalitis, edema, perivasculitis in extracellular spaces, and focal ischaemic necrosis because of thrombosis of small vessels.
Obstetrical trauma of the urethra is the result of foetal head disproportion leading to prolonged foetal head compression of the bladder and urethra against the pelvic bones, causing extensive ischaemic necrosis and subsequent fistula formation.