isentropic compression

isentropic compression

[¦īs·ən¦träp·ik kəm′presh·ən]
(thermodynamics)
Compression which occurs without any change in entropy.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The total flow which is a sum of the main gas flow, required for gas isentropic compression, and the extra flow caused by gas recirculating from the discharge line, is proportional to the impeller tip speed.
A model is developed for extra specific enthalpy rise beyond that needed to achieve outlet pressure for an isentropic compression process.
O'Donovan and Rallis [36], and Bradley and Mitcheson [37] among others derived expressions for the flame radius by dividing the control volume into burned and unburned gases assuming the isentropic compression, spherical flame, and spatially uniform pressure.
The process 1-2 is an isentropic compression process in which the inlet air (Pressure of 1.013 bar and volume of 0.985 [m.sup.3]) is compressed to pressure of 49 bar and volume is reduced to 0.0615 [m.sup.3].
The analysis of variation of physical properties of pure and blend refrigerants such as evaporator pressure ([P.sub.evap]), pressure ratio, isentropic compression work (W), refrigeration effect (RE), power consumption (P), volumetric refrigeration capacity (VCR), coefficient of performance of heating ([COP.sub.h]) and coefficient of performance of cooling ([COP.sub.C]).
2007) showed that, for a single stage refrigeration system operating with R134a between evaporating and condensing pressures of -27[degrees]C (80.6[degrees]F) and 42[degrees]C (107.6[degrees]F), isothermal compression can be as high as 16% more efficient than isentropic compression.
* The isentropic compression efficiency was taking as 0.8.
Knowing P1, T1 at the compressor inlet and isentropic compression, the temperature at the isentropic compression out point can be determined.
The technique--so relatively cold that tongue-in-cheek researchers have dubbed it ICE (for Isentropic Compression Experiments)--is a far faster and less expensive way to test materials over a wide range of stresses.
In the ideal version of the vapor-compression refrigeration cycle, process 1-2 is one of isentropic compression, with the refrigerant initially entering the compressor as a saturated vapor and leaving in a superheated state.
For isentropic compression, [W.sub.C] = m ([h.sub.2]-[h.sub.1]) (1)