isochronous curve

isochronous curve

[ī¦sä·krə·nəs ′kərv]
(mathematics)
A curve with the property that the time for a particle to reach a lowest point on the curve if it starts from rest and slides without friction does not depend on the particle's starting point.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Based on the experimental data in Figure 5 and combined with the Boltzmann superposition principle [33], the isochronous curve of rocks shown in Figure 6 is obtained.
Caption: FIGURE 6: Isochronous curves of sample ([[sigma].sub.3] = 3 MPa, T = 600[degrees]C).
The isochronous curve for polycarbonate is shown in Fig.
This required us to predict the average travel time between some missing coordinates in order to build the isochronous curves. With this aim, the kriging method (Phatarapon et al., 2015), which is based on regression methods and theories of probability, weights ([lambda]) the sampled points, multiplying them by the value of the variable of interest.
Using GIS, it was possible to define the isochronous curves obtained by applying the Kriging model using socio-demographic information on the study area: 404,805 inhabitants living in 95,361 households in an area of about 39.3 Km2, according to socioeconomic stratum, where stratum 1 is households with low economic capacity and stratum 6 are households with high economic capacity (See Figure 2).
11 by means of isochronous curves, in which v(t) is represented for a given time as a function of the applied axial deformation.
1a shows the isochronous curves corresponding to the frequency of 10,000 Hz).
The isochronous curves are found to be linear up to certain stress and strain levels.
The isochronous curves of water absorption as functions of volume fraction of hollow spheres [v.sub.s] are shown in Fig.