isokinetic temperature

isokinetic temperature

[‚ī·sə·ki¦ned·ik ′tem·prə·chər]
(physical chemistry)
The actual or virtual temperature at which rates of all members of a series of related reactions are equal.
References in periodicals archive ?
[DELTA][G.sub.b]--Gibbs free energy at isokinetic temperature, kJ [kg.sup.-1]; and,
In order to validate the enthalpy-entropy compensation theory, the Krug test (Eq.9) was applied to compare the isokinetic temperature ([T.sub.B]) with the mean harmonic temperature ([T.sub.hm]), whose approximate confidence interval (1-[alpha]; 100%) for the isokinetic temperature was calculated by Eq.
where: [T.sub.B] = isokinetic temperature (K); and [DELTA][G.sub.B]: Gibbs free energy at isokinetic temperature (kJ [kg.sup.-1]).
The isokinetic temperature is the temperature at which reactions in series occur at the same rate.
The established decrease in the values of [E.sub.a] and lnA under microwave heating compared to the conventional heating permits the possibility of new explanation of the influence of microwave heating on the kinetics of isothermal dehydration based on integration of Larsson model of activating the molecule via selective energy transfer (SET model) [44] and Linert concept of isokinetic temperature [45].
Based on the assumptions above, in accordance with the SET model, considering this resonance system as a classical forced damped harmonic oscillator, it is possible to get the expression for reaction rate constant and isokinetic temperature ([T.sub.ic]):
This indicates the existence of an isokinetic temperature ([T.sub.i]), because in the case of a series of pyrolysis processes there is a temperature [T.sub.i] at which the rate constant exhibits the same value [k.sub.i].
The isokinetic temperature has been used to characterize the temperature at which the product is in equilibrium, i.e., when all reactions occur simultaneously (Goneli et al., 2016a).
The isokinetic temperature is the temperature at which the reactions in a series occur at the same rate.
(1976a and b), the linear chemical compensation or compesantion theory exists only if the isokinetic temperature ([T.sub.B]) is different from the harmonic mean of the temperature ([T.sub.hm]).
However, only the difference between the harmonic mean temperature ([T.sub.hm]) and the isokinetic temperature ([T.sub.B]) may indicate that such relationship exists (enthalpy-entropy compensation theory).
Aiming to test the validity of the differential enthalpyentropy compensation theory, isokinetic temperature was compared to the mean harmonic temperature from the temperature range used in this work.