isolate

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isolate

[′ī·sə‚lāt]
(chemical engineering)
To separate two portions of a process system by means of valving or line blanks; used as safety measure during maintenance or repair, or to redirect process flows.
(electricity)
To disconnect a circuit or piece of equipment from an electric supply system.
(genetics)
A population so cut off from others that mating occurs only within the group.
References in periodicals archive ?
2011) Structure and reactions of an isolable Ge=Si doubly bonded compound, tetra(t-butyldimethylsilyl)germasilene.
Conscious life, he says, is "a life which is not individually isolable but is internally communalized" (336).
James Davies, in Revolutionary Change by Chalmers Johnson (1966), states that "Revolution is not a discrete, relatively isolable, purely political phenomenon; the factors that contribute to it are as manifold as the elements comprising society itself, and abstract generalisations about revolution must reflect this extreme complexity.
For Augustine, the possibility of meaning is "parasitic upon the presence of an object, an isolable thing" (69).
Reconfiguring the dreaded binary structure as an oscillating movement also compels us to attend to time as an integral aspect of ethical relation: ethics as process rather than isolable moment, ethics as dynamic relation rather than standing model.
Referring to the experience of disease as warfare would be completely foreign in the context of traditional Chinese medicine, for example, since while Western medicine "is primarily concerned with isolable disease categories or agents of disease, which it zeroes in on, isolates, and tries to change, control, or destroy," Chinese medicine "directs" its "attention to the complete physiological and psychological individual" from which it deciphers a "pattern of disharmony" or "situation of 'imbalance' " (Kaptchuk 4).
The text is merely a name for the strictly temporary operation of a temporarily isolable class of semiotic differences by which the ultimately inarticulable play of signification differentiates itself from itself in the form of a relatively constant object that postpones an imminent collapse into universal indifference.
Third, as an historian Moyn finds philosphical texts and movements to be more isolable and less permeable than their historical context warrants.
That is, subworlds are not related like isolable physical systems to larger systems they compose, but are rather, local elaborations of a whole, which they presuppose.
The empiricist account with its emphasis on isolable impressions is the model which Newman uses in his analysis of religious experience.
Such analysis of each basic intentional act, distinguished by its own "basic intention of the proximate end"--where this intention is an act of the will following the understanding and ordering of reason--proves quite helpful in identifying precisely the correct moral species of the isolable human act in question.
The singlewide, two-around press runs to pairs of upper and lower formers over a common double folder, where each folder is isolable for independent operation, giving the configuration flexibility for handling a variety of commercial product sizes.