isometric joystick

isometric joystick

(hardware)
Any kind of joystick where the input depends on the force exerted rather than the position of the control, e.g. TrackPoint.
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Cooper also talked about his research using VR simulations for testing and validation of an isometric joystick specifically designed for people with disabilities such as cerebral palsy and tremor.
Although movement-sensing joysticks (MSJs) are the current standard for most EPW users, researchers at the Human Engineering Research Laboratories (HERL) in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, have developed a newly designed isometric joystick (IJ) that has performed as well as conventional MSJs in both virtual and real driving tasks [13-19] (Figure 1).
Comparison of virtual and real electric powered wheelchair driving using a position sensing joystick and an isometric joystick.
Abbreviations: EPW = electric-powered wheelchair, HERL = Human Engineering Research Laboratories, IJ = isometric joystick, MS = multiple sclerosis, MSJ = movement-sensing joystick, PD = Parkinson disease, RMSE = root-mean-square error, WFLC = Weighted-Frequency Fourier Linear Combiner.
IJ = isometric joystick, MSJ = movement-sensing joystick, SD = standard deviation.
Analysis of position and isometric joysticks for powered wheelchair driving.
Card, English, & Burr, 1978: mouse, isometric joystick, keyboard; Fernandez, Cihangirli, Hommertzheim, & Sabuncuoglu, 1988: mouse, joystick, touch screen, trackball; MacKenzie, Sellen, & Buxton, 1991: mouse, tablet with pen, trackball; Sears & Shneiderman, 1991: mouse, touch screen; Sperling & Tullis, 1988: mouse, trackball; Ziefle, 2003: mouse, trackball).
The mini-joystick, a small isometric joystick that is sensitive to strain gauges, was placed between the "G," "H," and "B" keys on the keyboard, and its two mouse buttons were located in the wrist rest.
Evaluation of mouse, rate-controlled isometric joystick, step keys and text keys for selection tasks on a CRT.
The study found the custom software allowed the isometric joystick to function similarly to the motion-sensing joystick with respect to reaction time, total driving time, and driving accuracy.
This customized isometric joystick may therefore be useful as an alternative power-wheelchair control device.
To gauge effectiveness of possible improvements in this area, researchers at the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Pittsburgh Healthcare System's Human Engineering Research Laboratories (HERL) conducted the study; "Advancements in Power Wheelchair Joystick Technology: Effects of Isometric Joysticks and Signal Conditioning on Driving Performance," from April to May 2002.