isovolumic

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isovolumic

[¦ī·sō¦väl·yə·mik]
(physics)
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In the present study, the isovolumetric relaxation time (IVRT) showed mean and SD of 102 [+ or -] 20.
Reduced systolic and diastolic functions with an ejection fraction of 51% and delayed isovolumetric relaxation time (IVRT) of 102 ms were determined, respectively.
Early (E) and late (A) diastolic velocities, velocity time integrals and ratios of early and late velocities, velocity time integrals (E/A) as well as isovolumetric relaxation time was determined.
Left ventricular function was assessed by the following parameters: endocardial fractional shortening (EFS), midwall fractional shortening (MFS), ejection fraction (EF), posterior wall shortening velocity (PWSV), early and late diastolic mitral inflow velocities (E and A waves), E/A ratio, E-wave deceleration time (EDT), and isovolumetric relaxation time (IVRT).
Early (E) and late (A) wave velocities ratio (E/A), deceleration time (DT), and isovolumetric relaxation time (IVRT) were measured from the mitral inflow profile.
MPI has been increasingly used to assess both systolic and diastolic function of ventricles and is defined as the sum of isovolumetric cardiac activity divided by ET and could be measured for right and left heart separately.
Analysis of the diastolic variables was performed in the presence of a stable RR interval and in three different but sequential measurements from the 4-chamber view consisting of the measurements, by Doppler analysis, of transmitral flow of E-wave and A-wave peak velocities, isovolumetric relaxation and deceleration times and E/A ratio from 4-chamber view (13).
In addition to the position of the maximum, the algorithm finds the minimum of the acceleration signal corresponding to isovolumetric contraction (Ramos-Castro et al.
Herzig said that muscle contraction is an isovolumetric process in which shape changes but not the volume.
Between permission to void and uroflow start, the patient was unable to void in spite of sustained urge, most probably associated with spontaneous isovolumetric bladder contraction of low magnitude, and no significant change in bladder size or the organ's position would have occurred as the volume of urine in his bladder did not alter.
The PCR product was diluted with isovolumetric dd[H.