italic font


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italic font

A typeface with letters slanted slightly to the right. Italic type is used to emphasize words as well as for decoration. Most, but not all, fonts have an italic typeface.


The Four Typefaces
Many fonts come in normal, bold, italic and bold italic variations.
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[n.sub.2] neuron activity is independent of the others (in italic font) and [n.sub.5] neuron turns out to be presynaptic to the others (in bold font).
The brief prefatory section offers the background and personal context for the woman under consideration, but that section is not the important work here, as the book makes clear by using an italic font in the brief essays.
Furthermore, trademarks should be distinguished from the surrounding text with initial capital letters, bold or italic font, a [TM] symbol or, if the trademark is federally registered in the United States, an [R] symbol.
The typography is generally clear, but I find the small italic font used for many of the examples hard to read at any distance.
To read it all would be beyond even the most enthusiastic masochist not just because it is complete drivel (which from a cursory glance you discover it is) but because reading vast chunks of script, much published in italic font, is not particularly easy on a computer.
CAT now uses italic font (with roman for uncertain letters in place of KTU's asterisks).
(56) There is, however, one detail that would seem to go against such an interpretation: it has generally been accepted that the earliest Parisian italic font was being used by Guillaume Le Rouge by about 1507.
The CVC and the account number are both printed in a unique reverse italic font that is difficult to reproduce.
For example, as shown in Table 3, a source entry is Italic font, and its destination entry is Fonts, italic.
The family includes regular and bold fonts, in addition to two new italic and bold italic fonts.
Bold and italic fonts or underlining can be used to emphasize certain sections of importance to the particular reader.
A similar idiosyncrasy occurs with the use of italic fonts for the abbreviations of instruments, and the indication of timpani pitches after the change is certainly unconventional.