iteroparity


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iteroparity

[‚īd·ə·rə′par·əd·ē]
(biology)
Reproduction that occurs repeatedly over the life of the individual.
References in periodicals archive ?
Iteroparity has been also documented in Vampyroteuthis infernalis, the evidence of which was based on adult specimens where postovulatory follicles were present, indicating previous spawning (Hoving et al.
Finally, considering delayed iteroparity through the example of [[mu].sub.1] = 1, p = 0.4, and [[mu].sub.2] = 0.5, we find from (9b) that F = 45 at threshold and the corresponding fixed point becomes ([x.sup.*.sub.1], [x.sup.*.sub.2]) = (5.63, 4.51).
Iteroparity in the variable environment of the salamander Ambystoma tigrinum, Ecology, 88:891-903.
For example, a tendency to a lower parental investment, especially early in pregnancy, and/or a higher degree of iteroparity (Low, 1978; Morton et al., 1982) would be expected for M.
As a generalization, long-lived organisms are expected to exhibit a suite of characteristics including delayed sexual maturity, high adult survivorship, iteroparity, and increased reproductive effort with age; traits thought to be favored by selection in response to high and variable juvenile mortality (reviewed in Stearns 1992, Charlesworth 1994).
187-190) suggest that in the individuals with higher (total) fecundity a shift toward a reduction in reproductive life span (i.e., semelparity) will be favored, whereas low fecundity increases importance of later reproduction and thus a lengthening of reproductive life span (iteroparity).
Reproductive uncertaintly and the evolution of iteroparity: Why don't flatfish put all their eggs in one basket.
Usually, iteroparity means that the population spawns once sexual maturity is reached; therefore, the spawner biomass can be defined as the quantity of organisms greater than a specified size or age of maturity (Rideout et al.