iteroparous


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iteroparous

[‚īd·ə·rə′par·əs]
(zoology)
Capable of breeding or reproducing multiple times.
References in periodicals archive ?
gigas showed a multimodal distribution, demonstrating asynchronous oocyte development, which is common for iteroparous species (Murua & Saborido-Rey 2003).
However, Atlantic salmon face a variety of threats because of their anadromous and iteroparous life history (Legault, 2005; Maynard et al., 2017), such as overfishing, pollution, and the presence of dams (Parrish et al., 1998; Nieland et al., 2015).
Our results support the findings of Fox and Czesak (2000): species that do not show a quantity-quality tradeoff are often iteroparous, use adult-acquired resources for reproduction, or provide postembryonic parental care, all of which are characteristics of P.
Here, in contrast to the iteroparous case, the nontrivial equilibrium tends to be unstable in large parameter regions, also in case of low population densities.
Finally, when [beta] > [alpha], we find in contrast to the iteroparous model discussed in Example 2 that an increase of the number of age classes n acts in a destabilizing fashion.
This discrepancy was also found in Slimy Salamander (Plethodon glutinosus) (Petranka, 1998) and may be common among other iteroparous amphibians.
Their range expansion is in part due to the relatively constant water-conditions within many springfed systems in Texas (Brune, 1981; Hubbs, 2001) and because they are relatively long-lived, iteroparous, and parthenogenetic, allowing them to rapidly populate an area (Rader et al., 2003).
Among iteroparous organisms, the reproduction may be subdivided in two categories: 1) reproduction restricted to specific(s) period(s) of the year, known as seasonal iteroparity or seasonal reproduction or 2) continuous reproduction throughout the year, known as continuous iteroparity (Bell 1976, Sastry 1983, Pinheiro & Fransozo 2002, Negreiros-Fransozo et al.
Partial oosorption and also total reproductive failure were observed in a wide variety of iteroparous marine organisms and have been interpreted as a component of a fitness response trade-off of "present reproduction" against "future reproduction" [23-25].