erection

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erection

[i′rek·shən]
(civil engineering)
Positioning and fixing the frame of a structure.
(physiology)
The enlarged state of erectile tissue when engorged with blood, as of the penis or clitoris.

Erection

The hoisting and installing in place of the structural components of a building, using a crane, hoist, or any other power system.

erection

The hoisting and/or installing in place of the structural components of a building, usually using a crane, hoist, or other powered equipment.

erection

i. The assembly of a complete aircraft from subassemblies, components, or a dismantled state.
ii. A gyro-compass is “erected” when it is aligned along its proper axes, switched on, and has achieved its operating speed.
References in periodicals archive ?
Women and men dance in a frenzy around a large ithyphallic bisexual about to penetrate a small hourglass female with an explicit vulva.
A Scythian bronze figure from the north Caucasus, illustrated by Krausse (1996: 135), also bears a striking resemblance to Hirschlanden in its headgear, as well as its ithyphallic nature and, perhaps most intriguingly, the apparent depiction of a sloping face-mask, similar to that suggested for Hirschlanden (Figure 4).
11) The question may still be asked: did Coomaraswamy's History of Indian and Indonesian Art earlier have a photograph with ithyphallic Shiva?
As phallic images, the rooster's comb and the erect rods also link Black Peter to Blue Coal, the ithyphallic deity of The Last Days of Louisiana Red.
Yet, most New Kingdom temples in the Theban area have separate chapels for Amun-Re and his ithyphallic variation, Amun-Re-Kamutef (e.
The ithyphallic is the phallus in erection, as it was represented in Dionysiac or Bacchic feasts.
Even the chthonian alligator receives a man's body, retaining, however, the animal's characteristic penis, here aggressively ithyphallic (an alligator's virile member is normally neatly tucked away from view).
42) Dionysos is often depicted riding an ithyphallic mule (Carpenter 1991:38).
Elsewhere, the famous conceit of the compasses in 'A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning' introduces a logic that presents an ithyphallic mistress whose 'firmnes makes [the poet's] circle just' as the couple endure their forced separation and who 'growes erect' on his return home (ll.