jaagsiekte


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jaagsiekte

[′yäg‚sēk·tə]
(veterinary medicine)
A contagious disease of sheep, sometimes of goats and guinea pigs, resembling the more benign and diffuse forms of bronchiolar carcinoma in humans.
References in periodicals archive ?
Steve Raphael, a partner at AcademyVets in Stranraer, will chair a session on the 'Resilience of the national sheep flock to sheep diseases'at 1pm.The speakers and topics will be Dr Christina Cousens, an expert from Moredun on Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus and ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma.
In the mid-1920s, Edmund Vincent Cowdry, esteemed physician of Cowdry type A and type B inclusion bodies fame, among other entities, published 3 articles about jaagsiekte (from Afrikaans, meaning driving or chasing sickness) and progressive pneumonia in American and South African sheep, in which he described the alveolar thickening and epithelial proliferations typical of jaagsiekte.
Pulmonary adenomatosis (Jaagsiekte) |THIS is a virally induced contagious tumour affecting the lungs of sheep.
La enfermedad, historicamente denominada Jaagsiekte, es tambien conocida como Adenocarcinoma Pulmonar Ovino.
Sheep pulmonary adenomatosis (Jaagsiekte) in the United States.
Such infections pose a major obstacle to the intensive rearing of sheep and goat and diseases like PPR, bluetongue, and ovine pulmonary adenomatosis (Jaagsiekte) adversely affect international trade [2, 9, 10, 13], ultimately hampering the economy.
(5) others: enzootic nasal tumors and ovine pulmonary adenomatosis (Jaagsiekte).
In 2003 she died of Jaagsiekte, a lung disease caused by the retrovirus JSRN, common enough among sheep.
A virus called Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus infects sheep and goats, and is the only known virus to cause lung cancer in any animal.
In addition to Jaagsiekte retrovirus, there's a possible association between lung cancer and HPV, researchers from the International Agency for Research on Cancer reported last April at a meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research.
In an ideal world, he says he would buy his breeding replacements from a breeder who: was MV, OEA and Scrapie accredited; had treated with Cydectin LA (for scab), Zolvix (for resistant worms), Fasinex (for fluke) and Micotil (for footrot and CODD) before the sale; had tested for CLA and BDV before the sale; and was willing to give assurances on Orf, Johne's, Jaagsiekte and Ringworm "That's not much to ask is it," admits Mr Macfarlane, but although the list sounds daunting, a potential bidder should try to get reassurances on as many of these as they can.