Galbulidae

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Galbulidae

[‚gal′bu̇l·ə‚dē]
(vertebrate zoology)
The jacamars, a family of highly iridescent birds of the order Piciformes that resemble giant hummingbirds.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Galbulidae

 

(jacamars), a family of birds of the order Piciformes. The birds measure 13–39 cm in length and have long, slender bills. The legs are short, with four digits; certain representatives of the genus Jacamaralcyon have three digits. The plumage is soft, with an intense green or black sheen on the back.

The family embraces 15 species, which are distributed in the lowlands of tropical forests of Central and South America from southern Mexico to southern Brazil. They nest in burrows dug in termite nests or cliffs. There are two to four eggs per clutch. The brood period is 20 to 23 days. The young hatch covered with a thick down. The Galbulidae feed on insects, catching them in flight.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
This can be blamed on what psychologists call 'association' because in my mind I'd 'associated' the jacamars with the Jaikumars, a family I used to know.
the jacamars, I discovered, are indeed a family - of birds - from South and Central America; a species characterised by a long, pointed bill (no allusions to Mrs Jaikumar here, seriously) and an iridescent green plumage.
Before I could ask him his motive he says: "You could be forgiven for not knowing the jacamars and sevruga, but this one you surely must know, Kev."
The Rufous-tailed Jacamar Galbula ruficauda is the most widely distributed species in the family Galbulidae, with an extensive, but disjunct distribution in Central and South America.
Distribution of Rufous-tailed Jacamar Galbula ruficauda in Paraguay.
Handbook of the birds of the World, volume 7, Jacamars to Woodpeckers.
1974: Avian speciation in tropical South America, with a systematic survey of the toucans (Ramphastidae) and jacamars (Galbulidae).
Frogmouths Batrachostomidae; Owlet Nightjars; Potoos; Eared Nightjars; Nightjars; Treeswifts; Swifts; Hummingbirds; Trogons; Kingfishers Alcedinidae; Kingfishers Dacebridae; Kingfishers Cerylidae; Todies; Motmots; Bee Eaters; Rollers; Ground Rollers; Cuckoo Rollers; Hoopoes; Woodhoopoes; Hornbills; Ground Horbills; Jacamars; Puffbirds; Asian Barbets; African Barbets; Amercian Barbets; Honeyguides; Toucans; Wood- peckers; New Zealand Wrens; Pittas; Broadbills; False Sunbirds; Woodcreepers; Furnarids; Antbirds; Antthrushes; Gnateaters.
Field observations and feeding experiments on the responses of rufous-tailed jacamars (Galbula ruficauda) to free-flying butterflies in a tropical rainforest.