jacket

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jacket

Engineering
1. any exterior covering or casing, such as the insulating cover of a boiler
2. the part of the cylinder block of an internal-combustion engine that encloses the coolant

Jacket

 

a covering, usually removable, of a book or booklet in the form of a sheet with flaps. It is generally made of heavy paper coated for purposes of reinforcement or covered with a transparent synthetic film that also improves the jacket’s appearance. Jackets are sometimes made from polymer films. Originally, jackets were used to protect the bindings of expensive editions from damage; they were later used for purposes of publicity as well. The jacket sometimes serves a purely aesthetic purpose.

jacket

[′jak·ət]
(mechanical engineering)
The space around an engine cylinder through which a cooling liquid circulates.
(nucleonics)
A thin container for one or more fuel slugs, used to prevent the fuel from escaping into the coolant of a reactor. Also known as can; cartridge.
(ordnance)
Cylinder of steel covering and strengthening the breech end of a gun or howitzer tube.
The water jacket on some machine guns.
(petroleum engineering)
The support structure of a steel offshore production platform; it is fixed to the seabed by piling, and the superstructure is mounted on it.

jacket

jacket, 1
1. A metal or cloth covering over the heat insulation which is applied to exposed heating pipes and ducts.
2. An outer casing around a pipe or vessel, the space between being filled with a fluid for cooling, heating, or maintaining a fixed temperature.

jacket

jacket
A metal shroud used to insulate a portion of the hot section of a gas turbine engine. A jacket prevents heat damage to the aircraft structure.

jacket

A plastic housing that contains a floppy disk. The 5.25" disk is built into a flexible jacket; the 3.5" disk uses a rigid jacket.
References in classic literature ?
When he awoke, he was stiff but in better heart, and the kitten slept warmly and reassuringly inside his jacket.
But she sat there doing nothing, which was by no means my conception of the jade, so I brought a fieldglass to bear and discovered that the object was merely a lady's jacket.
We passed through the doors into the outer jacket, secured them, and then passing on into the cabin, which contained the controlling mechanism within the inner tube, switched on the electric lights.
But Fun See was delightfully Chinese from his junk-like shoes to the button on his pagoda hat; for he had got himself up in style, and was a mass of silk jackets and slouchy trousers.
I looked, too, at the seamen with the skiff -- big brown fellows, some in shirts, some with jackets, some with coloured handkerchiefs about their throats, one with a brace of pistols stuck into his pockets, two or three with knotty bludgeons, and all with their case-knives.
George's Hospital wore red jackets still; where there were oil-lamps; where Achilles was not yet born; nor the Pimlico arch raised; nor the hideous equestrian monster which pervades it and the neighbourhood; and so they drove down by Brompton to a certain chapel near the Fulham Road there.
The new frocks were taken off, and orders were given for the little girls to have their blouses put on, and the boys their old jackets, and the wagonette to be harnessed; with Brownie, to the bailiff's annoyance, again in the shafts, to drive out for mushroom picking and bathing.
They thronged the narrow length of our schooner's decks with their ornamented and barbarous crowd, with the variegated colours of checkered sarongs, red turbans, white jackets, embroideries; with the gleam of scabbards, gold rings, charms, armlets, lance blades, and jewelled handles of their weapons.
When the neighbour came in to say that it was time to start, Lena wound Chris's comforter about his neck and turned up his jacket collar--he had no overcoat-- and we watched him climb into the wagon and start on his long, cold drive.
Joe gave a pull at his necktie and a twitch at his jacket, and was off in a moment.
In a safe place Tom examined two large needles which were thrust into the lapels of his jacket, and had thread bound about them -- one needle carried white thread and the other black.
Rebecca never stopped long to think, more 's the pity, so she put on her oldest dress and hat and jacket, then wrapped her nightdress, comb, and toothbrush in a bundle and dropped it softly out of the window.