Jaguarundi

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Jaguarundi

 

(Felis yaguarundí), a predatory mammal of the family Felidae. The body measures as much as 80 cm in length, and the tail as much as 60 cm; the height at the shoulder is about 35 cm. Jaguarundis have a short-haired coat that may be grayish brown or smoky gray in color and in some individuals is bright red. There are light spots at the sides of the nose and on the chest. The jaguarundi inhabits South and Central America, Mexico, and the extreme south of the USA. It keeps to forest margins and shrub thickets. It feeds mainly on fish, lizards, birds, and rodents. It bears two to three young. The animals sometimes harm poultry.

References in periodicals archive ?
Surmising that the capture rates of margay reflect the abundance of the species, we can estimate a density three times lower than Southern tiger cat and jaguarundis in our study site.
Recently, insights about the effect of the presence and density of ocelots over ecological parameters of smaller species were described, showing that Southern tiger cat (Leopardus guttulus) (Schreber, 1775), margay (Leopardus wiedii) (Schinz, 1821) and jaguarundi (Puma yagouaroundi) (E.
Like Tewes, Giordano agrees that jaguarundis aren't a highlands species--but he sees too many similarities in the thick, brushy habitat of Big Bend and areas where the cat is known to exist.
Many witnesses believe they're dealing with the rare and endangered jaguarundi, a close relative of the puma that looks kind of like an otter and weighs slightly more than a house cat.
At present, there are approximately 100 ocelots in the United States and no known populations of jaguars or jaguarundis.
There were, however, approximately 12 interviews held with knowledgeable locals, including biologists, who attested to the presence of jaguarundis.
As in the case of onza jaguarundis, it was diagnosed by farmers as a species different from all felines known to science.
Ocelots, jaguars, and jaguarundis are all Southwest species that cross over the border from Mexico.
Raymond Skiles, resource management specialist at Big Bend National Park in Texas, also has received reports of jaguarundis.
Like jaguars and ocelots, jaguarundis inhabit a diverse array of habitats, including lowland forests and thickets (Kitchener, 1991), tropical dry forest (Bisbal, 1989), riparian habitat, and abandoned agricultural fields (Konecny, 1989).
Informants who believed they had seen jaguars, ocelots, or jaguarundis were contacted and interviewed in order to obtain detailed information, including the observer's level of wildlife expertise, sighting date and time, sighting location, weather during sighting, description of the encounter, description of the cat, and quality of sighting.
In total there were 22 cameras placed on roads, and 40 cameras on trails; jaguarundis were mainly photographed on roads (30 observations on roads, compared to 10 on trails; [x.