jardin anglais

jardin anglais

Literally, an English garden, particularly popular in the 18th century.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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That evening we drove to the medieval walled town of Dinan and after delicious savoury pancakes and discovering a fantastic local pear cider, we wandered up and down the streets of the beautiful old town, discovering the Basilique St-Sauveur church with its fabulous carvings bathed in a soft, purple dusk and the pretty Jardin Anglais park.
station near the Jardin anglais for the 'swiss Boat tour'.
Cruises are on offer, including on paddle steamers, from the Quai du Mont Blanc or the Jardin Anglais (English Garden), where the famous floral clock blooms as it ticks.
Time for a photo Get snapped in front of the Flower Clock in the Jardin Anglais, which has the world's longest second hand.
Querelles de jardins expose de maniere ironique le conflit esthetique entre le jardin francais et le jardin anglais. Ombres chinoises s'inspire du traite de Georges Polti, publie en 1916, "Les 36 situations dramatiques." La forme encyclopedique peut aussi affecter la structure du film luimeme.
Back at the Jardin Anglais (English Garden) you can see the flower clock -- a symbol of Geneva's famous watch industry.
A symbol of the Geneva watch industry of world renown, the famous flower clock, located at the edge of the Jardin Anglais (English Garden) since 1955, is a masterpiece of technology and floral art.
n Flower Clock: A popular local landmark, the Flower Clock sits at the edge of the Jardin Anglais. The clock face is made of roughly 6500 flowering perennials and annuals that are replanted and relandscaped twice a year.
If Piper's drawings produced for his Description, or those he prepared for this various built or proposed works resemble French or Italian beaux-arts exercises, perhaps it is because the English landscape that he so admired--possibly to the point of obsession--was more akin to what we now regard as the jardin anglais, or the jardin anglo-chinois, than we realise.
Hays' "'This is not a Jardin Anglais': Carmontelle, the Jardin de Monceau, and Irregular Garden Design in Late-Eighteenth-Century France." Hays' argument is strenuous and sineW but also lively and provocative, making a strong case for a French irregular garden style distinct from imitation of the English gardens of the period.