jettison

(redirected from jettisoning)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial.

jettison

(jĕt`əsən, –zən) [O.Fr.,=throwing], in maritime law, casting all or part of a ship's cargo overboard to lighten the vessel or to meet some danger, such as fire. Such cargo, when found later, is known as jetsam (see flotsam, jetsam, and liganflotsam, jetsam, and ligan
[O.Fr.], in maritime law, goods lost at sea as distinguished from goods washed ashore (wreck). Goods that remain floating on the surface after a shipwreck or accident are called flotsam (or floatsam or flotsan), while jetsam refers to goods thrown
..... Click the link for more information.
). The master of the ship has the absolute right to jettison cargo when he reasonably believes it to be necessary, and the owners of the ship incur no liability. If the vessel carries goods of more than one shipper, the rule of general average provides for apportioning the loss among all the shippers because all have benefited by the master's action. On the other hand, if some cargo is lost by accident, the shippers who suffered no loss do not contribute to indemnification.

jettison

[′jed·ə·sən]
(engineering)
The throwing overboard of objects, especially to lighten a craft in distress.

jettison

i. To cast or discard fuel or any external store from an aircraft in flight.
ii. The selective release of armament stores from an aircraft other than in a normal attack. This may be done to lighten the aircraft in an emergency or to get rid of a hung-up store.
References in periodicals archive ?
Jettisoning lines of business that were either unprofitable or did not offer the health plan a particular advantage was also part of the cure.
That way if the carts do fire, the mechanical safety, first detent, will prevent the pylon from jettisoning. Again, remember what you've been trained to do, then do it.
After my rep and I calmly went through all the procedures for unsafe-gear indications, he again talked me through jettisoning my external stores.
In the ambitions Noir, Way attempted to recreate the ambiance of Hollywood's film noir era, jettisoning tire nostalgia in favor of evoking the cold war paranoia that fuelled the popular ads in that period of American cultural history.
Sternfeld was following in the footsteps of a generation of American photographers for whom the automobile had been almost as integral to the project as the camera itself; like his fellow "New Color" road-trippers Stephen Shore and William Eggleston, he modified the itinerant documentary tradition as he went along, jettisoning its chromophobia and rethinking the snapshot ethos as well.