jingoism

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jingoism

(jĭng`gōĭzəm), advocacy of a policy of aggressive nationalism. The term was first used in connection with certain British politicians who sought to bring England into the Russo-Turkish War (1877–78) on the side of the Turks. It apparently derived from a popular song of the period: "We don't want to fight, but, by jingo, if we do … ."

Jingoism

 

a term designating extremely chauvinistic and imperialistic views. It came into use in Great Britain during the Russo-Turkish War of 1877-78, when the chauvinist mood strengthened sharply after the dispatch of a British squadron to Turkish waters to oppose the advance of Russian troops in Turkey. The expression “by jingo” was in the refrain of a patriotic song popular at that time. Propaganda for colonial expansion and kindling of national enmity is characteristic of jingoism.

jingoism

the belligerent spirit or foreign policy of jingoes; chauvinism
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Opposing the mounting racist and jingoist violence and ultranationalism in Germany in the 1920s, he worked for European unity and supported organizations seeking to protect Jews against growing anti-Semitic violence.
This attitude also reflects that of the late nineteenth-century age of imperialism, during which the jingoists attempted to fulfill what they believed to be the divinely ordained "manifest destiny" of American expansion.
This policy, Manifest Destiny, was endorsed by most of the clergy, who claimed that it was God's will for the United States to spread Christianity; the business community, who wanted more sources of raw materials and markets for manufactured products; the Southern states, which wanted more slave states; and American jingoists.
We are all now at risk, the jingoists who support Bush and Blair as well as, unfortunately, those who are able to foresee the consequences of the loudmouthed muscle-flexing that passes as American foreign policy.
But they feared that theocrats and jingoists would twist religion into a tool of imperial government to launch crusading conquests of other countries and to suppress freedom at home.
The most abominable threats will come from virtual nations of terrorists or jingoists who use networked societies and weapons within targeted nations to advance their causes.
By 1902 it had come to call up an image including soldiers, sailors, imperial administrators, missionaries, jingoists, and heathen and barbaric natives.
and international law (whereas a few jingoists such as Colonel McCormick of the Chicago Tribune reveled in the expansion of American power).
Like jingoists who consider any effort to understand terrorists immoral, on the grounds that to understand is to endorse, these hard-liners disdain complexity.
Halberstam, in particular, zeroes in on what makes Stone a filmmaker of some note: He countered the classic Hollywood view of war as personified by square-jawed jingoists like John Wayne.
T]he differences between civilians and combatants, or between pacifists and jingoists, often outweigh, or at the very least reconfigure, the differences between women and men.
Differences among women often dominate, such as those between civilians and combatants, or between pacifists and jingoists.