jingoism

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jingoism

(jĭng`gōĭzəm), advocacy of a policy of aggressive nationalism. The term was first used in connection with certain British politicians who sought to bring England into the Russo-Turkish War (1877–78) on the side of the Turks. It apparently derived from a popular song of the period: "We don't want to fight, but, by jingo, if we do … ."

Jingoism

 

a term designating extremely chauvinistic and imperialistic views. It came into use in Great Britain during the Russo-Turkish War of 1877-78, when the chauvinist mood strengthened sharply after the dispatch of a British squadron to Turkish waters to oppose the advance of Russian troops in Turkey. The expression “by jingo” was in the refrain of a patriotic song popular at that time. Propaganda for colonial expansion and kindling of national enmity is characteristic of jingoism.

jingoism

the belligerent spirit or foreign policy of jingoes; chauvinism
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Zirin profiles many of the heroes who have stood up to the bigots in the stands and in the suites, or who have taken on the jingoists.
If the structures of feeling evident recently have lost the confident assurance of Tressell's Owen and Barrington, they have lost, too, that long insistent sense of the workers as the media's dupes, as conned, drunken jingoists.
It would be a fitting way to have the last laugh after the vilification Beckham has received at home from jumped-up jingoists who pounce on their national team's greatest idol at the drop of a hat.
This attitude also reflects that of the late nineteenth-century age of imperialism, during which the jingoists attempted to fulfill what they believed to be the divinely ordained "manifest destiny" of American expansion.
We are all now at risk, the jingoists who support Bush and Blair as well as, unfortunately, those who are able to foresee the consequences of the loudmouthed muscle-flexing that passes as American foreign policy.
But they feared that theocrats and jingoists would twist religion into a tool of imperial government to launch crusading conquests of other countries and to suppress freedom at home.
and international law (whereas a few jingoists such as Colonel McCormick of the Chicago Tribune reveled in the expansion of American power).
When chauvinists, jingoists, and others of their persuasion are in a tiny minority, a nation is no threat to itself or to its neighbours.
Now, otherwise sane individuals and institutions have become gibbering jingoists.
O'Leary's extensive research and translation of obscure Gaelic publications substantially modify the image of the "Gads" as cultural jingoists whose policing of national art interfered with the production of their more cosmopolitan contemporaries, perhaps most familiar from accounts of the protests--the "riots"--over Synge's The Playboy of the Western World.
Unfortunately, Mayer's characterization of the set's early critics is, for him, uncharacteristically reactionary in tone: "Apart from the enormous ballyhoo that attended its publication in 1952, the set was attacked, with varying degrees of justification, by those modernists who believed that the world began last Thursday; by the cultural jingoists, who believed it began in America; by the small cliques (in those days) of admirers of oriental, female, and Negro writings; and by the partisans of those great writers who were excluded, such as Cicero, Calvin, Nietzsche, Leibniz, Mark Twain, and the Brontes.