job redesign

job redesign

an approach to the design of work which seeks to offset the negative social and psychological implications of directly supervised, simple and routine tasks through the provision of wider tasks, increased autonomy and feedback on performance. See also QUALITY OF WORKING LIFE, SOCIOTECHNICAL SYSTEMS APPROACH.

There have been several approaches to job design which, operating at different levels, have sought to offset the negative aspects of SCIENTIFIC MANAGEMENT. The first level at which job redesign operates involves adjusting the horizontal division of labour. Job rotation seeks to increase the variety of work an employee does by providing for mobility between specialized jobs. Job enlargement combines two or more previously specialized activities within one job. Critics of job redesign at this level point out that employees are unlikely to be satisfied by jobs which deny them the opportunity to exercise judgement and discretion. Little is to be gained by piling one boring job on top of another. Hence, proponents of job enrichment suggest that there is a need to reconstitute the vertical division of labour so that some traditionally managerial tasks, such as deciding on work methods, are built into the jobs of workers. Sociotechnical systems theory, which stresses the need to consider more than individual responsibility and judgement, can be seen to be compatible with the extension of job enrichment to tasks which are more technologically interdependent (Child, 1985). For example, self-regulating, multi-skilled work groups reduce the need for direct supervision and enhance the judgement. discretion and skill requirements of employees.

Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Interestingly, if the future of work means job redesign with either full automation or Al/human augmentation, multiple sources through which work may be done and a redefinition of what an organisation is and does, then many functions within companies --for example risk and HR--will have to change, and fast.
With AI and automation becoming more prevalent, executives are targeting job redesign as a top area for talent investment.
* Is there adequate investment in skill development, reskilling, up-skilling, job redesign and alternate work force models of the automated, skill-based and the gig economy?
Hackman, et al., "A New Strategy for Job Enrichment," in the July 1975 California Management Review.) These characteristics also form the basis for job redesign.
'Other interventions might be needed at least for some patients - possibly including stress management as part of cardiovascular disease rehabilitation, job redesign, or reducing working hours.'
He said a healthy lifestyle would always reduce a person's risk of premature death, but that other interventions, such as stress management courses, job redesign or reduced working hours, could help the most vulnerable.
In the past, organizations promoted frontline workers' engagement through reshaping their job characteristics by job redesign from the top down (Demerouti, 2014).
Other assessment options may include, but are not limited to, a return to work on normal or reduced hours/duties, job redesign, work in an alternative position temporarily or permanently, continued absence or medical retirement.
Several studies (e.g., Ford, 1969; Lawler, 1973; Maher, 1971; Meyers, 1970; Special Task Force, HEW, 1973; Vroom, 1964) have supported the theory of motivation through job redesign. Studies of job redesign have found that this technique is able to (1) significantly reduce turnover and absenteeism, (2) improve job satisfaction, (3) improve quality of products, and (4) improve productivity and outputs rates (Steers and Porter, 1987).
This is an example of job redesign, which can also be an effective cost-cutting measure.