cavity

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cavity

1. Dentistry a soft decayed area on a tooth
2. any empty or hollow space within the body
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

cavity

[′kav·əd·ē]
(biology)
A hole or hollow space in an organ, tissue, or other body part.
(electromagnetism)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The present study demonstrates that the injection of 10 ng/ml IL-17 into the rabbit knee joint cavity (1 injection every 2 days for a total of 3 injections) can induce OA similar to Hulth's method.
Damage to the cartilage causes more debris to enter the joint cavity, and creates fissures at the articular surface.
The classic radiographic appearance of synovial osteochondromatosis is multiple, spheroid, calcified masses within the joint cavity. The bodies tend to have a "popcorn ball" appearance characteristic of calcified cartilage.
Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease in which synovial cells, which line the inner surface of the joint cavity, proliferate due to an unknown cause.
The characteristic shape of the cells records their active function such as secretions toward the joint cavity and sensation for signals from the joint cavity (Shikichi et al., 1999).
Posteriorly, the capsule consists of vertical fibres arising from the femoral condyles, and is situated around the cruciate ligaments, excluding them from the joint cavity. Posterior to the cruciate ligaments is the oblique popliteal ligament.
Ameniscus is a crescent-shaped fibrocartilaginous structure that partly divides a joint cavity, unlike articular discs, which completely separate the cavity.
The deposition of the remaining blood was ob- served in the form of clots in the distal parts of the upper joint cavity 1h and 1 week after treatment.
Joint cavity involvement has been reported to occur in less than 5% of patients.
While the cause of rheumatoid arthritis is unknown, microorganisms or some other cause are thought trigger the proliferation of synovial cells, which line the inner surface of the joint cavity. Furthermore, this process causes an increase in the number of blood vessels in joints, and migration of lymphocytes, macrophages and other types of white blood cells from joint blood vessels to the synovial tissue in joints.

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