joint efficiency

joint efficiency

[′jȯint ə‚fish·ən·sē]
(metallurgy)
A numerical value expressed as the ratio of the strength of a riveted, welded, or brazed joint to the strength of the parent metal.

joint efficiency

In welding, the ratio of the strength of a joint to the strength of the base metal; expressed in percent.
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References in periodicals archive ?
FSW produces good joint efficiency especially for dissimilar ones as compared to other welding methods.
They found that for dissimilar 5083/6061 Al alloy joint the maximum joint efficiency () is 63% which is similar to that for 6061/6061 joints.
The average values of UTS of the tensile specimens and joint efficiency were calculated and presented in Table 4.
Joint efficiency is calculated as the ratio between the tensile strength of the FS welded joint and the base metal.
Dan Booker, global engineering director, propshafts at GKN, says the PX joint not only increases joint efficiency by more that 40%, reduces its size by more than 8%, and cuts weight by greater than 25%, "it improves vehicle NVH levels by reducing backlash in the system.
Among the three hardwoods, finger-joints from the low-density Obeche exhibited the highest joint efficiency of 88 percent and wood failure of 61 percent, followed by that from the medium-density Makore of 78 and 29 percent, respectively.
The joint efficiency of commonly used finger-joints in high-quality lumber used for lamination is said to be about 75 percent [15].
On the basis of joint efficiency and percentage wood failure, RF and ISO glues proved unsatisfactory as a bonding medium in the medium-density Makore and the high-density Moabi.
It is also reported that with respect to modulus of elasticity (MOE), finger joint efficiency (i.

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