joking relationship


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joking relationship

the anthropological term for ritualized insulting behaviour. RADCLIFFE-BROWN is credited with identifying widespread patterns of insult and stealing practised on the mother's brother by the sister's son. He interpreted this as a means of releasing the tensions inherent in certain social structural arrangements. ‘Mother-in-law jokes’ are often seen as an example of the same phenomenon in UK culture.
References in periodicals archive ?
(1982) 'Joking at death: the Mamprusi grandparent-grandchild joking relationship', Man 17 (4): 714-27.
Radcliffe-Brown (1940; 1949) famously analysed formal joking relationships that permitted disrespect as enabling the control of potentially tense social interaction.
"We have a great joking relationship about retirement," says Spielberg.
That's the joking relationship, which keeps Malians faithful to the tradition.
"The Joking Relationship in Industry." Human Relations, vol.
He spoke of two types of joking relationships, a symmetrical one in which each of two persons is able to tease and poke fun at the other and an asymmetrical relationship in which one of two persons is able to tease and rpake fun of the other while the other cannot retaliate (p.
(17) Moreover, the famous parente a plaisanterie ('joking relationship'), which operates on the basis of the relationships between cross-cousins, is used on a daily basis, including between strangers, in reference to some broad 'ethnic' affiliations found throughout Nigerien society.
The joking relationship is frequently analysed as a cathartic process for defusing social tension.
Among the Ambo (Stefaniszyn 1950), the institution of the joking relationship was called a 'funerary relationship', as 'funeral friends' played significant roles in performing the mourning rituals of those with whom they had been in a 'funeral friendship'.
Mr Webster borrowed the book because it contained a section on the anthropology of joking relationships; a convention where two different tribes are permitted to make fun of the other, who is required not to take offence.
The other group members recognize that the novice is powerless and nonthreatening, and they freely inlcude him or her in the pattern of joking relationships. To make a novice the butt of a joke, however, is considered tasteless--at least until he or she has had a chance to become known and accepted by the group.
Recently, Robert Launay (2006) has critiqued scholarship that overemphasizes joking relationships, arguing that it wrongly portrays joking behaviour as automatic.