joual


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joual

nonstandard Canadian French dialect, esp as associated with ill-educated speakers
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The ideological challenge embodied in joual's linguistic vulgarization is perhaps best expressed in the colourful lexicon of curse words derived from religion (known in French as sacres).
(For example, the 2003 play Past Perfect is a prequel of sort to Albertine in Five Times, depicting one evening in the life of Albertine in her twenties.) From Quebec herself, translator Gaboriau is well suited to wrangle the famously nationalist playwright's revolutionary use of joual, a raw working-class dialect of Montreal, into an English equivalent on stage.
El principio del capitulo se centra en estudiar el uso del joual (frances quebequense) por parte de los escritores y en especial en el teatro.
"They think we all speak 'joual' (local slang-filled blue-collar Quebec French) here.
They frequently speak in joual (5) and in a number of cases are virtually inarticulate even if, on occasion, their language attains expressive power and, in moments of high emotion, can border on the poetic.
The work in question, a play by Michel Tremblay called Les Belles-Soeurs, is particularly interesting as it is the first working-class theatre production, written in joual, shown in public in the "new" Quebec of the 1960s.
That is, they weren't really French, though we called them that because they spoke French; except that they didn't really speak French, according to some of their own, including Jack Kerouac (a Lowell native, like James McNeill Whistler and Bette Davis)--they spoke joual, so called from the word for cheval.
In terms of style, A toi, pour toujours, ta Marie-Lou is marked, as are almost all of Tremblay's plays, by the use of joual. The term joual is derived from the claim that a typical accent of Quebec led to the pronunciation of the word cheval as "joual." Prior to Tremblay's first successful play, Les Belles-Soeurs, joual was generally denigrated as an unfortunate marker of the uneducated, a language contaminated by both English vocabulary and translations of English expressions that were not part of the French idiom and sacrilegious oaths (the typical form of swearing in Quebec).
Moreover, 15 fevrier's modern dialogue, including plenty of joual, is one of several anachronisms that gives the picture raw immediacy and connects with its audience.
He was raised speaking the local French-Canadian dialect joual, the largely working class and oral idiom he continued to use with his mother throughout his life.
Born in 1922 in Lowell, Massachusetts, to working-class immigrant parents of mixed (Breton) French Canadian and possibly Iroquois stock, Kerouac grew up speaking a largely unwritten French Canadian dialect called joual. He did not learn English until he was forced to use it in school; by his own admission, he wasn't comfortable with it until his late teens and continued to speak joual for the rest of his life with his mother, Gabrielle.