joust

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joust:

see tournamenttournament
or tourney,
in the Middle Ages, public contest between armed horsemen in simulation of real battle. In this military game, which flourished from the 12th to the 16th cent., combatants were frequently divided into opposing factions, each led by a champion.
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joust

History
a combat between two mounted knights tilting against each other with lances. A tournament consisted of a series of such engagements
References in periodicals archive ?
Female jouster Nicky Willis prepares to do battle at Kenilworth Castle
The sport has rules and scoring and technique, and now that I'm in this suit of armour, I can tell you that anyone who can mount a horse while wearing this stuff, much less accomplish what a jouster is trying to accomplish, is a skilled athlete.
"Pain tolerance," the 45-year-old Moore said during a phone interview earlier this week, when asked the key to being a good jouster.
The first exclusive clip for the series shows the jousters practice for the real fight by getting hit by three aluminium bats, while in the second clip a jouster is seen getting back up after taking what is described as a "devastating hit".
Knightmare: dreaming about falling off a jouster's steed
(103) Her model, again, is the medieval knight Don Inigo Lopez de Mendoza, who learned how to wield all kinds of arms and was the most skilled jouster. But Padilla and her contemporaries also believed that this training was often absent because young men who lived at court were instead encouraged in the vain entertainments of dancing, music, and the theater.
O'Connor's well-known "Good Gray Poet" pamphlet is touched on, but more to Robertson's point is his 1867 novella, "The Carpenter: A Christmas Story." This Americanization of Dickens's "Christmas Carol" depicts Whitman "not just as a saint but a messiah." In contrast to the over-the-top jouster O'Connor (Whitman called him a "human avalanche"), Burroughs turned out to be perhaps the most low-key and distanced of the disciples (his New York aerie above the Hudson was 200 miles from Camden).
The crowd excitingly engaged in cheering on their favorite courageous jouster. Wonderful music was performed by the world-renowned Prague Symphony Orchestra while exquisitely period-dressed participants entertained the crowd.
Joan of Arc, an accomplished fencer and jouster, may now be regarded by lesbian athletes as "the first female action hero," but to claim her as one of us requires a degree of what can only be called "gay abandon." Warren is probably on firmer ground in theorizing that Joan of Arc may have been a transgendered or intersex person.