judge

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judge

a leader of the peoples of Israel from Joshua's death to the accession of Saul
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

What does it mean when you dream about a judge?

A judge may represent an authority figure—in real life or in the dreamer’s psyche—who constantly condemns or criticizes spontaneous actions that are considered to be unruly and frivolous. A dream in which one feels guilty about committing a wrong may indicate a subconscious need to condemn one’s actions—self-judgment. Alternatively, judges may represent justice or good/bad judgment. (See also Court).

The Dream Encyclopedia, Second Edition © 2009 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
What usually happens in such cases is the judge takes the time to explain to the defendant that the "rule of law" means the sentence must be imposed, even if the sentence is contrary to the judge's sense of justice and a sentence that is "sufficient but not greater than necessary." (41) Even so, sentencing is a solitary act that--probably more than anything else a judge does--comports with the perception and expectation the public has of "judging." The public, and the bar, want such difficult decisions to come from a judge, not a law clerk, and not even with the influence of a law clerk.
Judging was held in conjunction with NAMA's Agribusiness Forum.
This year's judging panel includes: Walt Auburn, assistant director of the Maryland Energy Administration (MEA); Steve Baden, executive director of the Residential Energy Services Network (RESNET); Walt Holton, president of Holton Homes; Dr.
If your entry makes it through divisional and regional judging and reaches the second stage of judging, the Blue Ribbon Panel, your final judge and jury is a two-person appraisal team.
Unless the share of the populace with the attributes necessary for good judging has risen equally, or the relative attractions of the field have increased, the system must be relying on an increasing proportion of ill-suited people.
Diversifying the judging pool, while challenging tournament directors, will improve the educational value of forensics.