judy


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Related to judy: Judi Dench

judy

In air interception, a code meaning, “My radar has locked onto the contact and no further assistance is required.” This is not a very commonly used term.
References in classic literature ?
Judy the twin is worthy company for these associates.
Judy never owned a doll, never heard of Cinderella, never played at any game.
Judy, with a gong-like clash and clatter, sets one of the sheet- iron tea-trays on the table and arranges cups and saucers.
Judy, with her brother's wink, shakes her head and purses up her mouth into no without saying it.
"She'd want sixpence a day, and we can do it for less," says Judy.
Judy answers with a nod of deepest meaning and calls, as she scrapes the butter on the loaf with every precaution against waste and cuts it into slices, "You, Charley, where are you?" Timidly obedient to the summons, a little girl in a rough apron and a large bonnet, with her hands covered with soap and water and a scrubbing brush in one of them, appears, and curtsys.
"What work are you about now?" says Judy, making an ancient snap at her like a very sharp old beldame.
Go along!" cries Judy with a stamp upon the ground.
George sits, with his arms folded, consuming the family and the parlour while Grandfather Smallweed is assisted by Judy to two black leathern cases out of a locked bureau, in one of which he secures the document he has just received, and from the other takes another similar document which hl of business care--I should like to throw a cat at you instead of a cushion, and I will too if you make such a confounded fool of yourself!--and your mother, who was a prudent woman as dry as a chip, just dwindled away like touchwood after you and Judy were born--you are an old pig.
Judy, not interested in what she has often heard, begins to collect in a basin various tributary streams of tea, from the bottoms of cups and saucers and from the bottom of the teapot for the little charwoman's evening meal.
"But your father and me were partners, Bart," says the old gentleman, "and when I am gone, you and Judy will have all there is.
One might infer from Judy's appearance that her business rather lay with the thorns than the flowers, but she has in her time been apprenticed to the art and mystery of artificial flower-making.