juice


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juice

any liquid that occurs naturally in or is secreted by plant or animal tissue

Juice

 

a beverage made from fresh fruits, berries, or vegetables.

A distinction is made between clear juices, which are made by pressing already processed (usually chopped up) fruits or berries, and juices with pulp, which are obtained from the strained pulp of fruits and vegetables rich in carotene and other valuable water-insoluble components. Distinctions are also made between natural juices (from one type of fruit or vegetable without the addition of other substances), mixed juices (mixture of several types of juices), sweetened juices (with the addition of sugar or sugar syrup), carbonated juices (concentrated with carbon dioxide), and concentrated juices (evaporated juices).

Methods of preserving juices include pasteurization (or sterilization), freezing, treatment with antiseptics or other chemical substances (most often with sulfurous, benzoic, and sorbic acids and their salts), fermentation, and fortification with ethanol (which produces intermediates for wine-making).

Juices are particularly important as a source of vitamins, especially vitamin C. For example, the vitamin C content is 250–300 mg percent in blackberry juice and 100 mg percent in mandarin juice.

The most common fruit and berry juices in the USSR are grape, apple, cherry, and prune; the most common vegetable juices are tomato and carrot. Grape juice contains 15 percent dry matter (including 13.2 percent carbohydrates), 3.5 mg percent vitamin C, and 0.12 mg percent carotene. It has an acidity of 0.2 percent. Also contained in grape juice are vitamin B,, vitamin P, and salts of potassium, iron, calcium, and phosphorus. Tomato juice contains 4.8–5 percent dry matter (including 3 percent carbohydrates and 0.8 percent proteins), 15 mg percent vitamin C, and 0.5 mg percent carotene; vitamin B1; vitamin B2, vitamin PP, and mineral salts are also contained in the juice.

REFERENCES

Fan-lung, A. F., B. L. Flaumenbaum, and A. K. Izotov. Tekhnologiia konservirovaniia plodov i ovoshchei, 3rd ed. Moscow, 1969.
Plodovye i ovoshchnye soki. Moscow, 1969. (Translated from Bulgarian.)

A. F. NAMESTNIKOV

juice

(1) See JeOS and Joost.

(2) Slang for electrical power.
References in classic literature ?
The spider became much distended by the juices of its prey, which was many times larger than itself.
so I must now call my tent and my cave); but before I got thither the grapes were spoiled; the richness of the fruit and the weight of the juice having broken them and bruised them, they were good for little or nothing; as to the limes, they were good, but I could bring but a few.
Actually was he hungry when he had megapode eggs, and the well-nigh dried founts of saliva and of internal digestive juices were stimulated to flow again at contemplation of a megapode egg prepared for the eating.
Megapode eggs only stung his taste alive and stimulated the flow of his juices.
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Case-patients were significantly more likely to have drunk orange juice served at the breakfast buffet (82%) than were controls (64%) (odds ratio 2.
so you'll pay $35 or $40 a bottle for the noni or mangosteen juice they sell over the Internet or to their friends.
Doctors subsequently advised many patients not to consumer the juice while using certain medications.
Citrus juice works in the same way as salt on your taste buds.
Combine mai tai mix, orange juice, pineapple juice, sparkling water, lemon juice and ice cubes in a 2-gallon punch bowl.
Many "fruit drinks" reveal on their labels that they actually contain 10 percent or less real juice.