jumping gene


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Related to jumping gene: transposon

jumping gene

[¦jəmp·iŋ ¦jēn]
(genetics)
A mobile genetic entity, such as a transposon.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
To set up a powerful system studying jumping gene adaptation, the researchers needed a tool to control their activity.
[USA], July 30 ( ANI ): Turns out, almost half of our DNA sequences are made up of jumping genes, which are also known as transposons.
Their findings, published September 28 in Nature, show that over evolutionary time, primate genomes have undergone repeated episodes in which mutations in jumping genes allowed them to escape repression, which drove the evolution of new repressor genes, and so on.
These jumping genes are actually small pieces of DNA that can copy themselves throughout a genome and are known as transposable elements.
The jumping gene first landed in the cortex intron in about 1819, the researchers calculated from historical measurements.
The effect of jumping genes could be likened to cutting a small section from a tape recording of a Beethoven symphony and re-splicing it into the tape elsewhere, usually with a disruptive effect.
"This is the way we proved that a jumping gene was in glossy-15," Sisco says.
The researchers say that this difference is due to a small fragment of genetic information: a so-called "jumping gene" or "transposon" of viral origin, localized in a non-coding segment of the gene Zfp69, whose effect it diminishes.
Further exploration of the tea genome revealed what Dr Gao and colleagues called "jumping genes." These genes are sequences within the genome where the genes have essentially copied themselves in a variety of locations.
229) for the discovery of one such mechanism, a gene-silencing system called RNA interference, or RNAi.) Alien DNA from viruses or selfish bits of genetic material known as transposons, or jumping genes, can wreak havoc on a genome, damaging a gene that they hop into.