jumping gene


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Related to jumping gene: transposon

jumping gene

[¦jəmp·iŋ ¦jēn]
(genetics)
A mobile genetic entity, such as a transposon.
References in periodicals archive ?
So even though the sequence helps with jumping activity, losing it gives the jumping gene an advantage in primates by allowing it to escape repression by ZNF93.
The jumping gene first landed in the cortex intron in about 1819, the researchers calculated from historical measurements.
In 1982 Allan Spradling and Gerry Rubin showed that a jumping gene called 'P-element' can be used to genetically transform fruitflies by carrying any gene on these P-elements and putting them into the fruitflies.
Maria Nilsson and colleagues at West-falische Wilhelms Universitat Munster in Germany compared jumping genes in the seven main branches of marsupials.
The integrated viroidal RNA complementary DNA can form jumping genes producing defects in gene coding for different proteins and genetic disease.
Rare striped roses such as the mediaeval red-and-white striped Rosa mundii, and the modern red-and-yellow striped `Harry Wheatcroft' are well known examples of jumping genes that modify genes for petal pigment.
They go by other names, such as jumping genes, transposable elements, biased gene converters or meiotic drivers.
Washington, May 8 ( ANI ): Modern-day orangutans are host to ancient jumping genes dubbed Alu, which are over 16 million years old, according to a new study.
Today, one of the most important biotech tools Baker and co-researchers have at their command is jumping genes.
Many exceptional discoveries have been announced to the scientific community on these occasions, including the structure of DNA, the existence of jumping genes and RNA splicing, and the invention of the polymerase chain reaction.
The researchers recognized L1 retrotransposons -- distinguishing them from the vast amount of fixed "fossil" transposable elements that litter the genome -- because these actively jumping genes are human specific and almost exactly the same in sequence from one person to another.
The researchers aligned these mobile elements to the human genome, and found that close to 100 of the human genome's non-coding elements are derived from these jumping genes.