kainosite

kainosite

[′kī·nə‚sīt]
(mineralogy)
Ca2(Ce,Y)2(SiO4)3CO3·H2O A yellowish-brown mineral composed of a hydrous silicate and carbonate of calcium, cerium, and yttrium.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mineralogical work completed by the company indicated that a wide variety of rare-earth element-bearing minerals have been identified, including apatite, iimoriite, kainosite, gadolinite, allanite, bastnaesite, parisite, brannerite, thalenite, xenotime, fergusonite, synchysite (Y), and monazite.
Below the tiny lake called Trubtensee, west of the pass, a Strahler named Lucek in 1955 collected many specimens showing small, half closed iron roses resting on aplite matrix with quartz, fluorapatite, pyrite, and corroded crystals of the very rare species kainosite. Similar specimens were found in 1963 by Walter Hofer near the glacier's flank, opposite the Hotel Belvedere; one beautiful specimen from this discovery is a quartz crystal enclosed by a wreath of intergrown hematite roses (Parker, 1973).
In the Northern Urals alpine type veins gave us endless varieties of quartz and crystals of axinite, brookite, anatase, rutile, hematite, ilmenite, kainosite, adularia, calcite and more.
Bill Cook used his unique X-ray technique to identify some of the forms of kainosite. Dr.
Ancylite crystallized during the last stages of the growth of quartz crystals, and is associated with chlorite, apatite, titanite, calcite, fluorite and kainosite. In the final phase of ancylite formation, pyrite crystallized as tiny cubes on the ancylite crystal faces.
Kainosite-(Y) occurs at Puiva in two different parageneses: kainosite (I) is found as a cleft filling with chlorite and fluorapophyllite, and on terminal faces of quartz crystals, where it may be intergrown with ancylite; in these cases, pyrite occurs as a still later growth on the two rare-earth species.