kapok

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kapok

(kā`pŏk, kăp`ək), name for a tropical tree of the family Bombacaceae (bombaxbombax
, common name for the Bombacaceae, a family of deciduous trees, often tall and with unusually thick trunks, found chiefly in the American tropics. The family includes many commercially important members, e.g.
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 family) and for the fiber (floss) obtained from the seeds in the ripened pods. The floss has been important in commerce since the 1890s; the chief source is Ceiba pentandra, the kapok (or silk-cotton) tree, cultivated in Java, Sri Lanka, the Philippines, and other parts of East Asia and in Africa, where it was introduced from its native tropical America. The floss is removed by hand from the pods, dried, freed from seeds and dust, and baled for export. The lustrous, yellowish floss is light, fluffy, resilient, and resistant to water and decay. It is used as a stuffing, especially for life preservers, bedding, and upholstery, and for insulation against sound and heat. The seed kernels contain about 25% fatty oil used for soap or refined as edible oil. The residual cake is valuable as a fertilizer and as livestock fodder. Kapok is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Malvales, family Bombacaceae.

Kapok

 

the fibers from the fruits of the ceiba plant (Ceiba pentandra), or silk-cotton tree, of the family Bambacaceae. The plant is native to tropical America; it is cultivated in the tropics, particularly in Asia. These white or brownish fibers have a length of 10–35 mm and a thickness of 0.02–0.04 mm. They are soft and form on the inner side of the husks not on the seeds. The fibers are nonwettable and do not become matted. In water, kapok is several times more durable than cork. After they are separated from the seeds and fruit parts, the fibers are dried, sorted, and compressed into bales. Kapok is used as a filling for life buoys, life jackets, furniture, mattresses, and pillows. It is also used as sound and heat insulation.

kapok

[′kā‚päk]
(botany)
Silky fibers that surround the seeds of the kapok or ceiba tree. Also known as ceiba; Java cotton; silk cotton.

kapok

a silky fibre obtained from the hairs covering the seeds of a tropical bombacaceous tree, Ceiba pentandra (kapok tree or silk-cotton tree): used for stuffing pillows, etc., and for sound insulation
References in periodicals archive ?
Table 1: Nage clan names Clans named after trees and other plants * Boa Kapok tree (Ceiba pentrada).
The protesters-bikers, businessmen and students-walked for a kilometer from this town's municipal hall in Barangay (village) Timugan to the site where a line of kapok trees used to be.
The DPWH earlier came under fire for cutting down 18 kapok trees (Ceiba pentandra) without a DENR permit in the initial phase of the road-widening project.
Bantayan estimated the fallen kapok trees (Ceiba pentandra) to be more than 50 years old.