katabatic wind


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Related to katabatic wind: Anabatic wind

katabatic wind

[¦kad·ə¦bad·ik ′wind]
(meteorology)

Katabatic Wind

 

a flow of cold air down relatively gentle slopes of mountain ranges, caused by the force of gravity (in contrast to the bora, which blows down steep slopes). Such winds are observed primarily at night when the ground layer of air cools. They include glacier winds, which are more intense in the summer when the air above glaciers is especially cool relative to the air above the surrounding area at the same elevation. The most severe katabatic winds occur in Antarctica, where air flows from the high continental ice cap to the shores; these winds reach high velocities near the shores but do not extend farther than 8–10 km into the ocean. The direction of katabatic winds at the antarctic shore is most frequently southeast; this is a result of the meridional component of the wind and the eastward movement of air around a continent in the course of general atmospheric circulation.

katabatic wind

katabatic wind
The cold wind that flows down the slopes of the mountains and spreads at the base of the mountains.
References in periodicals archive ?
At higher elevations, winter snow redistribution due to katabatic winds results in an increase in accumulation from the centre of the ice cap towards the margins, with the minimum accumulation encircling the ice cap at elevations 100-200 m below the summit (Koerner, 1966b).
Katabatic winds blew the aerosol cloud over 50, 100, 200, and 400 sampling arcs.
A cold breeze streams from the glaciers, an echo of katabatic winds that howled when ice held sway.
Fernando, 2008: Quasi steady katabatic winds over long slopes in wide valleys.
The Santa Ana winds are katabatic winds that originate over the Great Basin - a large area covering most of Nevada and half of Utah, as well as portions of Idaho, Wyoming, and California.
They are: Folkestra, a folk band led by Kathryn Tickell; Jambone, a jazz big band; the wind orchestra Katabatic Winds; the choir Quay Voices; steel pan band Volcano; and the Young Sinfonia, the chamber orchestra associated with the Northern Sinfonia.
Glacier and katabatic winds characterized the meso-scale circulation between storm periods.
Young Sinfonia (classical), Jambone (jazz) and Folkestra (folk) have been joined by two new ensembles: Katabatic Winds and Quay Voices.