katakana


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katakana

(Japanese)
The square-formed Japanese kana syllabary. Katakana is mostly used to write foreign names, foreign words, and loan words as well as many onomatopeia, plant and animal names.
References in periodicals archive ?
Traces over katakana Teacher miteinai You're not looking miteinai You're not looking hai miteinai Excuse me, you're not looking Student Lachlan Lachlan Traces over katakana RESTATING
Japanese students often find it more difficult to write Kanji than Hiragana and Katakana words because of the visual complexity of the Kanji letters (Sato, 1997; Tamaoka & Kiyama, 2013).
Beyond alphabetic orthographies: The role of form and phonology in transposition effects in Katakana. Language and Cognitive Processes, 24, 67-88.
Japanese is a language that has three kinds of writing: kanji, hiragana and katakana, which increases the difficulty in acquiring proper writing skills.
This urban landscape is filled with skyscrapers with neon signs displaying katakana symbols, and, upon moving from sky to ground level, we are brought into a seedy alley between buildings marked with hiragana and kanji.
In Asian scripts Hiragana and Katakana syllables are manageable because of their finite number, but pictographs as found in Kanji and Mandarin pose big challenges.
The image of their disintegration is visually coupled to images of their generation: a recurring sequence throughout Knights of Sidonia involves an initial radar contact with a "mass union ship," followed by a rapid spawning of individual units, each designated with a tiny "ga"--the katakana indicating not only their foreignness (katakana being used primarily for loan words) and abstraction (why a character and not some sort of icon or pictograph?
(12) The buzzword jenda-furi (gender free), written in katakana (the phonetic syllabary conventionally used to transcribe foreign language words), was coined and disseminated in this booklet.
Of interest in this case is that the Japanese version is modelled after the English, rather than the Chinese version, in that the Japanese katakana script attempts to reproduce the English pronunciation.
"This common orientation of all five statues strongly argues that the linear patterns were indeed designed to form an archaic alphabet system, perhaps one similar to that employed in Japanese Hiragana and Katakana. The results presented here also suggest that successful translation of the text found on the Cyprus statues might permit a translation of older text, such as the astronomical text found on circa 30,000 year old artifacts in Africa, Asia and Europe, to be possible," he added.