kaus


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kaus

[kau̇s]
(meteorology)
A moderate to gale-force southeasterly wind in the Persian Gulf, accompanied by gloomy weather, rain, and squalls; it is most frequent between December and April. Also known as cowshee; sharki.
References in periodicals archive ?
"By the time we get the telephone call they have (often) run out of money," Kaus said.
Mickey Kaus' position within the national public policy discussion has always been that of a tweak-your-own-side contrarian.
In the world of track and field, being unattached means an athlete isn't competing for a team but as an individual, and that's no longer the case for sisters Laura and Regan Grube or for sisters Stephanie, Linsey and Hayley Kau, four of whom will compete in the USA Track & Field Junior Olympic Region 13 Championships in Seattle today and Sunday.
"It seems," says Kaus, "that nearly every cabdriver in Mexico has heard of La Zona del Silencio, but not the Mapimi Biosphere Reserve." CONTACT: Earthwatch Institute, www.wildworld.org/ mapimi.
Series-Skipper is broken down into categories such as: "Entertaining Anecdote," "Intriguing but Unexplored Incidents" and "Most Dramatic Scene." Kaus also gives a guesstimate of the time saved by reading Series-Skipper instead of reading the series itself.
"Clinton's political advisers seem to believe that the only way to win over the struggling middle class is to deliver tangible benefits--tax cuts, job training, health insurance," Kaus writes.
Unfortunately, Kaus and his ilk still have the upper hand.
Mickey Kaus: Look at what Roosevelt did in the winter of 1934 and '35.
ROBERT KAUS: Named to the Supreme Court in 2015 when William Rehnquist expired after 43 years of service, the final seven of those years conducted via holocom from Rehnquist's suspension chamber at Bethesda Naval Hospital, where his prefrontal cortex was connected to maintenance devices following the death of his cardiovascular system, digestive system, and brain stem and the inadvertent erasure of most of his personality by a poorly trained night shift technician.
As to the latter, I obviously agree with Mickey Kaus that we were wrong in the early seventies to support a guaranteed annual income wit >;hout a work requirement because we have since changed our position to support such a requirement.