keel

(redirected from keeling)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms, Wikipedia.
Related to keeling: keel over

keel

1
1. one of the main longitudinal structural members of a vessel to which the frames are fastened and that may extend into the water to provide lateral stability
2. any structure corresponding to or resembling the keel of a ship, such as the central member along the bottom of an aircraft fuselage
3. Biology a ridgelike part; carina

keel

2 Eastern English dialect
1. a flat-bottomed vessel, esp one used for carrying coal
2. a measure of coal equal to about 21 tons

keel

a fatal disease of young ducks, characterized by intestinal bleeding caused by Salmonella bacteria

Keel

 

(1) Keel of a vessel—a longitudinal, usually composite, beam running in the middle of the vessel bottom from the bow to the stern. The keel serves as a basic longitudinal link providing strength and rigidity to the bottom and overall stability to the vessel’s hull.

Wooden vessels have a keel in the form of a bar; this form was also retained on old metal-hull vessels (bar keel). On modern double-bottomed steel vessels the keel consists of a thick reinforced plate on the bottom and one or two (duct keel) vertical plates located between the double bottom. Bilge keels (side keels) in the form of long rigid plates are installed along what is called the turn of the bilge on the outside of the hull in order to lessen the rolling of the vessel.

(2) Keel of an airship—fin or vertical stabilizer—part of the tail unit of an aircraft located in a vertical (or inclined) plane and designed to provide directional stability. A flight rudder is attached by hinges to the trailing edge of the fin.

keel

[kēl]
(naval architecture)
A steel beam or timber, or a series of steel beams and plates or timbers joined together, extending along the center of the bottom of a ship from stem to stern and often projecting below the bottom, to which the frames and hull plating are attached.
(vertebrate zoology)
The median ridge on the breastbone in certain birds. Also known as carina.

Keel

[kēl]
(astronomy)

keel

An appendage of a molding, usually a fillet, on the furthest projection of a molding.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mr Keeling asked Dominic why he lied to police if he "hadn't done anything wrong".
Following his predecessor Denis Brosnan's departure after 21 years, Keeling inherited the long-running behind-the-scenes saga that revolved around Kavanagh's potential to invoke a contract of indefinite duration (CID).
Keeling must have been one of the first manufacturers to get professional players to endorse his product, with names like Stanley Matthews and Nat Lofthouse signed up to promote Newfooty.
On the fateful night, a British national, Michael Mannion, said that he saw Keeling with one Murali Sagar, who later turned eyewitness after admitting to taking drugs with the victim and the two accused, around 5 am.
With its 29 locations serving primarily the mid-south region of the United States, The Keeling Company is part of Kasco's large international distributor network.
I do not think that Keeling could have improved upon the documentation of his sources, and he makes it easy for others following in his footsteps to understand his work.
The Keeling Curve starts in 1958 and continues uninterrupted for over five decades.
Keeling, whose 10 goals and eight assists earned him all-conference honours on New York's Long Island is appealing the decision, and a lawyer for his family suggests a court battle could ensue.
"We came together as federations because it is extremely important to not only work at the global level but also local level" said Keeling.
HOW does the judge who ruled on the case of Luke Keeling - as reported in last week's Sunday Mercury - live with himself ?
But chief executive Jonathan Keeling said he hopes to nearly double that number in the medium term, and has his eye on two new clients in the subcontinent by the end of the year.